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Speech to the Troops at Tilbury

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Speech to the Troops at Tilbury

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Elizabeth Tudor, who later became Elizabeth I or England, was born on September 7, 1533 at Greenwich Palace. She was the second daughter of King Henry VII, a ruler engrossed with the requirement of a male heir. Her mother was Anne Boleyn, the second of Henry's six wives. When Elizabeth was merely two years old, her father, in desperation of a male heir and upset had Anne executed. Queen Elizabeth I became the ruler of England at the age of twenty-five. Her coronation took place on January 15, 1559. Elizabeth was left the task of repairing a kingdom that her sister had left a divided mess. Elizabeth soon restored the Protestant Church in England and restored the declining currency. By the 1580's, Elizabeth had descended into disfavor with Philip II of Spain. She was Protestant and had also refused his marriage proposal years before. Elizabeth continuously attempted to negotiate her way to peace without conflict. However, in the summer of 1588, Philip II of Spain sent his enormous fleet against the English nation. In an effort to rally the troops at Tilbury, Elizabeth made of the most famous speeches of her career. Through their superior tactics, ship design, and good fortune, the English defeated the Spanish Armada. The conflict with the Spanish Armada represented the summit of a long and drawn out struggle among Protestant England and Catholic Spain. England became very prosperous during the second half of Elizabeth's time in power. Elizabeth's reign as Queen of England occurred during one of the most constructive periods in English history. Literature began to flourish during her reign through the works of playwrights like Edmund Spenser, poets like Christopher Marlowe, and men of letters such as Francis Bacon. William Shakespeare, one of the greatest writers in English history, also was a major player in the evolution of English literature. Elizabeth also became a character within literary text of that era. Shakespeare's, A Midsummer Night's...