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speech

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  • September 21, 2014
  • 353 Words
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  • Course: SPT 1113
  • Professor: Smith
  • School: Holmes Community College, MS
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A commemorative speech are speeches of praise or celebration. The speaker aims of this speech is to pay tribute to a person, a group of people, an institution, or an idea. Each speech that you will give has a purpose. In a commemorative speech the main purpose is inspire your audience. The speaker is trying to arouse and heighten the audiences appreciation of or admiration for the person, institution, or idea you are praising. When giving a commemorative speech it is important for the speaker to express feelings that connects with what your talking about. You want to capture the audience and invite them in and let them see why you are giving praise to whatever it is you might be. A commemorative speech depends mostly on the creative and subtle use of language. When giving a commemorative speech it is most successful when the speaker is meaningful and inspiring with the use of language. Your ability to put your real thoughts and emotions into your words can great benefit how the audience will react to what you have said. The speaker will have a greater effect on grabbing the audiences attention if he or she focuses on specific details for example tone, repetition, and vivid language. The book gives us an example of how a few changes to the opening of a speech can have a dramatic affect. Using these specific language techniques can also keep the audience interested in what the speaker is saying. A commemorative speech is about praising or celebrating something and if we were to stand up and give a speech in a monotone voice than it wouldn't seem like we were praising or celebrating anything. Specific language techniques that would be appropriate for a commemorative speech would be metaphor, simile, parallelism, repetition, antithesis, and alliteration. As a speaker your biggest challenge is to get the audience to imagine what your saying. Christenings, weddings, funerals, graduations, award ceremonies, inaugurals, and retirement dinners are all examples of...
A commemorative speech are speeches of praise or celebration. The
speaker aims of this speech is to pay tribute to a person, a group of people,
an institution, or an idea. Each speech that you will give has a purpose. In a
commemorative speech the main purpose is inspire your audience. The
speaker is trying to arouse and heighten the audiences appreciation of or
admiration for the person, institution, or idea you are praising. When giving a
commemorative speech it is important for the speaker to express feelings
that connects with what your talking about. You want to capture the
audience and invite them in and let them see why you are giving praise to
whatever it is you might be. A commemorative speech depends mostly on
the creative and subtle use of language. When giving a commemorative
speech it is most successful when the speaker is meaningful and inspiring
with the use of language. Your ability to put your real thoughts and emotions
into your words can great benefit how the audience will react to what you
have said. The speaker will have a greater effect on grabbing the audiences
attention if he or she focuses on specific details for example tone, repetition,
and vivid language. The book gives us an example of how a few changes to
the opening of a speech can have a dramatic affect. Using these specific
language techniques can also keep the audience interested in what the
speaker is saying. A commemorative speech is about praising or celebrating
something and if we were to stand up and give a speech in a monotone voice
than it wouldn't seem like we were praising or celebrating anything. Specific
language techniques that would be appropriate for a commemorative speech