Spectacular Youth Culture

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  • Topic: Goth subculture, Subculture, Gothic rock
  • Pages : 3 (1012 words )
  • Download(s) : 1492
  • Published : March 11, 2009
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Spectacular Youth Cultures

Youth Culture is the collective cultural practices of groups of young people (typically between the ages of 15 and 25) these are groups that apart from the dominant or “mainstream” society. Youth subculture groups are often distinguished through distinctive forms of dress style and shared musical tastes, and are typically found in westernized, consumer-based cultures although more recent research has identified examples of youth cultures in developing countries. Many youth subculture groups are also identifiable by a shared name, recognized both by members of a given group and those outside the group. A distinctive youth subculture or (spectacular) is a subculture that has its own ideology such as its own set of norms and values which makes them usually stand out from mainstream youth cultures. Such names are generally associated with the musical taste and style of the youth cultural group—for example, rockers, punks, Goths, rappers, and so on. The main two subcultures that are most popular are: Goths

The Goth subculture is a contemporary subculture found in many countries. It began in the United Kingdom during the early 1980s in the gothic rock scene, an offshoot of the post-punk genre. The Goth subculture has survived much longer than others of the same era, and has continued to diversify. The Goth subculture has associated tastes in music, aesthetics, and fashion, whether or not all individuals who share those tastes are in fact members of the Goth subculture. Gothic music encompasses a number of different styles. The term "Goth" as we know it today was coined by several different early Goth Rock bands in the late 1970's and early 1980's. Goth Rock bands like Siouxsie & the Banshees, Joy Division, Bauhaus, and UK Decay were called "gothic" enough by the music media that eventually the label stuck. In 1979, Tony Wilson, on the BBC program "Something Else," described Joy Division's sound as "gothic in comparison with mainstream...
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