Special Olympics

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Sample MONROE’S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE Persuasive Outline
Making a Difference Through the Special Olympics
Specific Purpose: To persuade the audience to donate time to the Special Olympics Central Idea: it would be very rewarding to volunteer to work with the Special Olympics because they have contributed a lot in helping people with disabilities

Introduction
I. ATTENTION: In Seattle, nine young athletes began racing in the 100-yard dash as the gun went off. A. All except one little boy who stumbled on the asphalt, tumbled over a couple of times, and began to cry. B. When the other eight runners heard the boy cry, every single one of them turned around and ran to his side. C. One girl with Down syndrome kissed him and said, “This will make it better.” D. Then all nine linked arms and walked to the finish line—together. II. These athletes were competing in the Special Olympics. III. Founded in 1968, Special Olympics encouraged the world to understand that people with disabilities can be respected, valued, contributing members of society. IV. One of those children that crossed the finish line could have fallen into your arms, or some day one of them could be your own child. V. After working as a volunteer for Special Olympics and doing additional research for this speech, I want to encourage you to donate your time as a Special Olympics volunteer. (TRANSITION: We’ll start by looking at the need for volunteers.)

Body

I. NEED :. As Special Olympics has grown over the years, so has the need for volunteers.

A.Today more than 1.3 million athletes compete in Special Olympics around the world.

1 Participants must be at least eight years old and must be identified as having an intellectual or cognitive disability.

2 There are currently 200 Special Olympics programs in more than 150 countries.

B.The success of Special Olympics depends on its large corps of volunteers.

1 Here...
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