Southwood School

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TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Southwood School: A Case Study in Training and Development
By Fiona L. Robson

Project team Author: SHRM project contributors: External contributor: Editor: Design: Fiona L. Robson Bill Schaefer, SPHR Nancy A. Woolever, SPHR Sharon H. Leonard Courtney J. Cornelius, copy editor Terry Biddle, graphic designer

© 2008 Society for Human Resource Management. Fiona L. Robson Note to Hr faculty and instructors: SHRM cases and modules are intended for use in HR classrooms at universities. Teaching notes are included with each. While our current intent is to make the materials available without charge, we reserve the right to impose charges should we deem it necessary to support the program. However, currently, these resources are available free of charge to all. Please duplicate only the number of copies needed, one for each student in the class. For more information, please contact: SHRM Academic Initiatives 1800 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA Phone: (800) 283-7476 Fax: (703) 535-6432 Web: www.shrm.org/hreducation 08-0769

Southwood School: A Case Study in Training and Development

caSe StUDY NarratIVe Introduction Southwood school administrators realized that a newly designed performance management system for their support staff 1 would require a formal training program. Designing and implementing the new performance management system was a challenge for the organization; the last system was unpopular with employees, and negative feelings about the value of performance management linger. Case Overview As discussed in the fi rst Southwood case study, some of the issues identified with the previous performance management system included:  

Annual deadlines to complete the process were missed by many staff members. Some staff members were confused about what exactly needed to be completed and when. There were complaints that the previous system was a “waste of time” and that there were no measurable outputs. A trade union representative felt the system was not appropriate for all staff members. Criteria on the forms were irrelevant to support staff. For example, support staff could not set objectives in pupil progress or have lessons observed. There was little attention on identifying training needs, and where needs had been identified, there was no follow-up with appropriate actions. Appraisals were led by teachers with little knowledge of their appraisees’ jobs. Performance meetings were a one-way process; often, performance goals were identified before the meeting and without the appraisee’s input. Examples of support staff jobs include: administrative positions (secretaries, administrators); student support positions (learning mentors, learning support assistants, special needs assistants, computer technicians); teacher support positions (teaching assistants, departmental assistants such as science technicians); and strategic/management positions (HR manager, finance manager, director of administration, director of information technology).









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© 2008 Society for Human Resource Management. Fiona L. Robson 1

A new system was designed in consultation with all stakeholders to address the issues raised with the previous system. School leaders felt that a formal training program was vital to ensure all employees supported the new system. This case study demonstrates how the training was designed and delivered and some of the complexities involved in this process. Case Details The case study consists of two parts: I. II. Designing the training program for managers (appraisers). Designing the training program for appraisees.

I. DeSIGNING tHe traINING ProGram For maNaGerS (aPPraISerS). The managers in this case study are the appraisers in the new performance management process. In some cases, they will be teachers with no formal management qualifications. In other cases, they will be support staff with specific management...
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