South Africa

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National Flag of South Africa
Country: South Africa
Proportions: 2:3
South African Flag Description:
The flag of South Africa consists of two horizontal stripes of equal width - red on the top and blue on the bottom. The red and blue stripes are separated by a green middle stripe which is bordered in white and splits into a horizontal Y. On the left side of the flag there is a black isosceles triangle which is outlined in yellow.

South African Flag Meaning:
Although the colors have no official meaning attached to them the South African flag incorporates the colors black, green and yellow of Nelson Mandela's political party, the African National Congress and the former Boer republics flags (red, white, and blue). The Y shape represents the convergence of South Africa's diverse society and the desire for unity. The South African flag is basically made up of former South African flags and the past meanings of the colors were Red for bloodshed, blue of open blue skies, green for the land, black for the black people, white for the European people and yellow for the natural resources such as gold. South African Flag History:

The South African flag was adopted on April 27, 1994 after Nelson Mandela was elected President. A new national flag was adopted to signify the dawn of a new democratic South Africa and to reflect the country's political transformation. It is one of the world's newest flags. South Africa gained independence from Britain on May 31, 1910 COLONIZATION

In 1652, a century and a half after the discovery of the Cape Sea Route, Jan van Riebeeck established a refreshment station at the Cape of Good Hope, at what would become Cape Town,[20] on behalf of the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch transported slaves from Indonesia, Madagascar, and India as labour for the colonists in Cape Town. As they expanded east, the Dutch settlers met the southwesterly migrating Xhosa people in the region of the Fish River. A series of wars, called the Cape Frontier Wars, ensued, caused by their conflicting land and livestock interests. The discovery of diamonds and later gold triggered the 19th-century conflict known as the Anglo-Boer War, as the Boers (original Dutch,Flemish, German and French settlers) and the British fought for the control of the South African mineral wealth. Cape Town became a British colony in 1806. European settlement expanded during the 1820s as the Boers and the British 1820 Settlers claimed land in the north and east of the country. Conflicts arose among the Xhosa, Zulu and Afrikaner groups who competed for territory. Great Britain took over the Cape of Good Hope area in 1795, to prevent it from falling under control of the French First Republic, which hadinvaded the Dutch Republic. Given its standing interests in Australia and India, Great Britain wanted to use Cape Town as an interim port for its merchants' long voyages. The British returned Cape Town to the Dutch in 1803, but soon afterwards the Dutch East India Company declared bankruptcy. The British annexed the Cape Colony in 1806. The British continued the frontier wars against the Xhosa, pushing the eastern frontier through a line of forts established along the Fish River. They consolidated the territory by encouraging British settlement. Due to pressure ofabolitionist societies in Britain, the British parliament stopped its global slave trade with the passage of the Slave Trade Act 1807, then abolished slavery in all its colonies with the Slavery Abolition Act 1833.

Boers in combat (1881)
In the first two decades of the 19th century, the Zulu people grew in power and expanded their territory under their leader, Shaka.[21] Shaka’s warfare led indirectly to the Mfecane (“Crushing”) that devastated and depopulated the inland plateau in the early 1820s.[22][23] An offshoot of the Zulu, the Matabele people created a larger empire under their king Mzilikazi, including large parts of the highveld. During the 1830s, approximately 12,000...
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