Souls of Blacks

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Reflection Paper – The Souls of Black Folk
By: W. E. B. Du Bois

Thesis:
W. E. B. Du Bois' The Souls of Black Folk is an influential work of art for African American literature. Within this book Du Bois proposes that "the problem of the Twentieth Century is connected with the color of people’s skin color." He also represents his concepts of life behind the hard times of race calling it the “double-consciousness theory”, this is the sense of always looking at their selves through the eyes of others," thinking about race in America, in addition to these enduring concepts, “Souls of the black folk” offers an study of the progresses of race, the obstacles to that once race suffers from, and the possibilities for future progress as the nation entered the twentieth century. Key Points in Support of Thesis

Du Bois examines the years immediately following the Civil War; to be specific he touched on subjects about Freedmen's Bureau's role in Reconstruction. The Bureau's failures were due not only to the southern opposition and "national abuse," but also to mismanagement and courts that were biased "in favor of black lawsuits." The Bureau did have successes as well, and its most important contribution to progress was the founding of African American schools. Since the end of Reconstruction in 1876, Du Bois claims that the most significant event in African American history has been the rise of the educator, Booker T. Washington, to his role as spokesman of the race. Du Bois argues that Washington's approach to race relations is counterproductive to the long-term progress of the race. Washington's acceptance of segregation and his emphasis on material progress represent an "old attitude of adjustment and submission." Du Bois asserts that this policy has damaged African Americans by contributing to the loss of the vote, the loss of civil status, and the loss of aid for institutions of higher education. Du Bois insists that "the right to vote," "civic...
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