Solving Case Study

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HOW TO SOLVE CASE STUDY

Submitted to
Dr.RITANJALI MAHJI,
SOM, NIT Warangal

Submitted by

u.srikanthganesh (109526)
srikanthganesh119@gmail.com

Definition:

• A case study is a puzzle, which has to be solved. The case have a enough information that can be understand what the problem is and, after thinking about it and analyzing the information, and come up with a proposed solution. Solving a case study is a bit like writing a detective story, and also summarizing. • A case study is description of an Enterprise, History and Environment Internal Operations. Case studies do not have full information, but enough information is providing to draw a conclusion. The objective of a case study is to solve business problems, using a logical framework. The issues in a case are generally not unique to a specific person, firm, or industry, and they often deal with more than one retail strategy element. Sometimes, the material presented in a case may be in conflict. • Case study refers to the collection and presentation of detailed information about a particular participant or small group, frequently including the accounts of subjects themselves. A form of qualitative descriptive research, the case study looks intensely at an individual or small participant pool, drawing conclusions only about that participant or group and only in that specific context. • A case study presents an account of cases happened to a business over a no. of years. It shows path to managers to deal such challenges in competitive environment. This usually involves changing the Business. History Of Case Study

• The 1950s marked the dawning of a new era in case study research. • "Instituted at Harvard Business School in the 1950s as a primary method of teaching, cases have since been used in classrooms and lecture halls alike, either as part of a course of study or as the main focus of the course to which other teaching material is added" (Armisted 1984). • The basic purpose of instituting the case method as a teaching strategy was "to transfer much of the responsibility for learning from the teacher on to the student, whose role, as a result, shifts away from passive absorption toward active construction" (Boehrer 1990). • By careful examination and discussion of various cases, "students learn to identify actual problems, to recognize key players and their agendas, and to become aware of those aspects of the situation that contribute to the problem" (Merseth 1991). • In addition, students are encouraged to "generate their own analysis of the problems under consideration, to develop their own solutions, and to practically apply their own knowledge of theory to these problems" (Boyce 1993). Along the way, students also develop "the power to analyze and to master a tangled circumstance by identifying and delineating important factors; the ability to utilize ideas, to test them against facts, and to throw them into fresh combinations (Merseth 1991).

SOLVING A CASE STUDY

In all case studies, analyze what is presented and state which specific actions best resolve major issues. These actions must reflect the information in the case and the environment facing the firm.

STEPS IN SOLVING A CASE STUDY

• Read the Case properly

• List out the major opportunities before the company

• Identify the problems faced by a company

• Examine Multiple solutions, and analyze all available course of action

• choose the best solution

• explain how to implement the solution

EXAMPLE

Budweiser Lager was first brewed in 1876 by E. Anheuser & Co., St. Louis. Today, Anheuser-Busch is the largest brewer in the world in terms of volume, and it competes across a diverse range of markets. The company oversees more than 30 different beer brands, including the domestic market leader Budweiser, a number of other alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages, a group of theme parks, and a...
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