Solving America's Immigration Problem Through Integration

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The need for low skilled and cheap labor exists in America and so do the millions of legal and illegal workers needed to fill this demand. The problem then is not one of numbers, skill, legality, national origin or labor needs but rather one of integration. The current problem with America’s immigration-policy is that it is outdated and nonfunctional in the face of such a distinct influx of immigrants from one bordering state to the other. If there is to be any solution to America’s immigration problem it is necessary to address the fears associated with immigration and the threat they pose to integration. It is imperative to recognize that economical, social and cultural integration of this section of our population are crucial to the future well being of the American society. Economic integration is an issue that largely pertains to low skilled illegal immigrants. Currently over 11 million illegal immigrants reside in the United States of America, and “labor-force participation for illegal immigrant men is the highest of any group at 94 percent.” (Jacoby p.53) This easily underlines the importance of these illegal immigrants in small and big businesses, and thus their crucial role in the American economy. Yet instead of focusing on integrating foreign legal and illegal workers who, as quoted above, are working in various fields such as hospitality services or agricultural sectors, the immigration policy has made it its priority to find ways to punish businesses and immigrants by organizing military like raids. These raids not only destabilize and lead businesses to considerable losses, but they also further aid the branding of illegal immigrants as second-class citizens by leaving them at the mercy of employers who threaten to ruin the dreams of the workers, by cutting the latter’s wages. The fear of many citizens that immigrants are “taking jobs that Americans could take” (Judis p.2) has put a dent in economic integration, only this belief doesn’t appear to...
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