Solubility Lab

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Purpose: To observe the reactions of specific aqueous solutions with specific aqueous reagents.

Introduction: A solution is as a homogeneous mixture containing two or more substances. Reagents are added to solutions to create a chemical reaction or added to see if anything occurs. Reagents can be added to solutions to see if there is a presence of other substances. For example, iodine added to a lead solution. Iodine would be the reagent and would cause a chemical reaction confirming the presence of lead. We use a qualitative chemical analysis to identify elements present in the solutions, in this case, adding a reagent. A quantitative chemical analysis is used to determine the percentage of a substance in the solutions. Solvation is the process of the attraction between the molecules in the solvent and the molecules in the solute. Whether or not a solute will dissolve into a solvent is determined by the polarity of the substances. When a substance is polar, it has opposite charges on opposite ends, while non-polar have the same charge on both ends. When opposite charges are near each other, they are attracted to each other. This attraction pulls the molecules or ions of the solute apart. The “like dissolves like” rule means that polar solutes will dissolve into polar solvents and non-polar solutes will dissolve into non-polar solvents.

Materials:
Part A (Cations)

Solutions Reagents

- Ca(NO3)2 - KI
- Pb(NO3)2 - K2CrO4
- Ba(NO3)2 - Na2CO3
- Mg(NO3)2

Part B (Anions)

Solutions Reagents

- Na2SO4 - Pb(NO3)2
- NaCl - Ba(NO3)2
- Na2CO3 - HNO3
- KI

Other Materials:
- 100ml beaker
- Dropper
- Distilled Water
Procedure: (As per lab sheet)

Observations:...
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