Sol 1

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 72
  • Published : February 19, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Seasons of Life: Infancy and Early Childhood
Nicole R. Gee
Contra Costa College

The following reviews the value of understanding human development over a lifetime and highlights key theories from within the first five years of life as recognized in the Seasons of Life video series. Included is a reflection on a theory of attachment, three clocks that influence life, temperament and early memories. How these theories pertain to the individual‘s early development and effects in later years will be discussed along with the author’s personal opinion.

Seasons of Life: Early Perspective
What appears to be universally interesting about life is people. This is evidenced by the large amount of information, resources and theories that surround people and their development. The video series Seasons of Life: Infancy and Early Childhood (1990) highlight key elements in early development and their effects that contribute toward the individual throughout their life.

One theory mentioned in Seasons of Life, is that of attachment. John Bowlby expressed that innately humans are equipped at birth to cause attachment to their caregivers. If the attachment is successful the cycle should continue, acting as the foundation for healthy, successful relationships throughout the lifespan (Bowlby, 1982). Each of the child subjects in the Seasons of Life appeared to have successful attachment to their caregiver. This was regardless of whether the child stayed primarily in the home for care and was surrounded with extended family, had few local relatives, spent time in day care or had a grandparent as a main caregiver.

Also reviewed in the film were three clocks that caused influence in people’s lives. The first was a biological clock. This clock was said to have the strongest influence early on, and as early as in the womb. The second was a social clock. This clock was described as society’s age related expectations of the individual at any given time...
tracking img