Soil Moisture Content Laboratory Test

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  • Topic: Particle size distribution, Atterberg limits, Compressive strength
  • Pages : 37 (6328 words )
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  • Published : April 1, 2013
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2011

Table of Contents

Table of Figures5

Synopsis6

1.Soil Moisture Content Test7

1.1.Introduction7

1.1.1.Australian Standards7

1.1.2.Limitations7

1.2.Method7

1.2.1.Apparatus7

1.2.2.Procedure7

1.2.3.Calculations8

2.Particle Size Distribution Test9

2.1.Introduction9

2.1.1.Australian Standard9

2.1.2.Limitations9

2.2.Method9

2.2.1.Apparatus9

2.2.2.Procedure10

2.2.3.Calculations10

2.2.4.Results11

2.3.Conclusion12

3.The Atterberg Limits13

3.1.Introduction13

3.1.1.Australian Standards13

3.1.2.Limitations13

3.2.Method13

3.2.1.Apparatus13

3.2.2.Procedure15

Plastic Limit15

Liquid Limit16

Shrinkage Test16

3.2.3.Calculation16

3.3.Conclusion17

4.Unconfined compressive strength test18

4.1.Introduction18

4.1.1.Australian Standards18

4.1.2.Limitations18

4.2.Method18

4.2.1.Apparatus18

4.2.2.Procedure18

4.2.3.Calculation18

4.3.Conclusion19

5.Moisture/Density relationship Test20

5.1.Introduction20

5.1.1.Australian Standards20

5.1.2.Limitations20

5.2.Method20

5.2.1.Apparatus20

5.2.2.Procedure21

5.2.3.Calculations21

5.3.Conclusion22

6.Field Density by Sand Replacement Test23

6.1.Introduction23

6.1.1.Australian Standards23

6.1.2.Limitations23

6.2.Method23

6.2.1.Apparatus23

6.2.2.Procedure24

6.2.3.Calculations25

6.3.Conclusion26

7.California Bearing Ratio Test27

7.1.Introduction27

7.1.1.Australian Standards27

7.1.2.Limitations27

7.2.Method27

7.2.1.Apparatus27

7.2.2.Procedure28

7.2.3.Calculation28

7.3.Conclusion29

References30

Bibliography31

APPENIDIX A1: Lab Worksheets32

APPENIDIX 1: Classification report33

Table of Figures

Figure 1: Casagrande apparatus13

Figure 2: Standard liquid limit apparatus14

Figure 3: grooving tool14

Figure 4: shrinkage moulds14

Figure 5: Sand cone pouring tool23

Figure 6: Motorised CBR Machine27

Introduction

Soils can be regarded as engineering material in the geotechnical sense, they are naturally occurring materials which more often than not have to be used in their natural conditions, therefore the physical properties of soils should be determined before being used for engineering purpose. Soil samples are usually taken to laboratory to be tested, and these tests can be divided into two main categories:

1. Classification tests, which indicate the general type of soil and the engineering category to which it belongs.

2. Tests for the assessment of engineering properties, such as shear strength, compressibility and permeability.

Soil Moisture Content Test

1 Introduction

This test is to determinate the moisture content of a soil as a percentage of its oven-dried weight. The method is based on removing soil moisture content by oven-drying a soil sample until the weight remains unchangeable. The moisture content of the soil sample can be calculated from the different weight before and after the initial drying.

2 Australian Standards

• AS1289.2.1.1

• AS1289.2.3.1

3 Limitations

Limitations of this test are:

• This test cannot be done accurately on clay and other cohesive materials

• The oven must stay at a specific temperature ranges.

• The samples are not allowed to cool prior to weighing, otherwise will be required for certain balances.

4 Method

5 Apparatus

The following apparatus is required to do this test:

• A drying oven complying with AS 1289.0.

• A heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant container.

6 Procedure

The test...
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