Get 20% off StudyMode
Page 1 of 3

Sociological Theories Applied to the Film V for Vendetta

Continues for 2 more pages »
Read full document

Sociological Theories Applied to the Film V for Vendetta

  • By
  • June 2010
  • 932 Words
  • 10 Views
Page 1 of 3
Theorists are individuals who attempt to describe social phenomenon. What is interesting is that these theories have been around for many years and they can be applied to our current social era. I will apply theories introduced by theorist like George Herbert Mead, Karl Marx, and Emile Durkheim to a film that was released in 2006 titled V for Vendetta. Legal Authority, according to Max Weber rests on the belief that the legality of enacted rules and the right of those in authority to issue such rules and commands (Appelrouth & Edles, 179). The film begins with a loud announcement over speakers that a 9:00 pm curfew is in effect for everyone in London. These orders are enforced, by “Fingermen” of the Chancellor. “Fingermen” are police like individuals who ensure that the curfew imposed is respected. Other rules are also imposed in the film are homosexuality, it is not allowed because it is deemed morally wrong by the Chancellor. The use or practice of other religions is also against the rules. Altruistic Suicide, according to Emile Durkheim is having a strong relationship to your group and ultimately, “the individual gives his life for the social group” (Appelrouth & Edles, 112). This can be observed in the film when the character “V” makes a deal with Creedy, Creedy is V’s only way to get close to Sutler. V has planned to kill Sutler and plans to do so in exchange for his surrender to Creedy. V knows that this is a dangerous plan since Creedy will certainly kill him, but V is only concerned with advancing the purpose of the 5th of November. V is willing to give up his own being for what he believes in and the good of others. According to Emile Durkheim, The “coercive power” of social facts raised in The Rules of Sociological Method: crime is a nessecity because, “a society exempt from crime is utterly impossible, it is impossible to all be alike (Appelrouth & Edles, 94).” Durkheim argues that crime is inevitable or “normal” in all societies...