Sociological Benefits of Outdoor Education

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NORTH GLASGOW COLLEGE

CREATIVE ARTS SPORT AND WELLBEING

1

Student’s Name:Rebecca Currie
Date:15th February 2013

1 Class:HN2 Outdoor Education

2 Unit Title: Amosoa

Outcome (s)Outcome 1
Tutor: Nicola Craig
Word Count:1565
PASSREMEDIATION

Outcome 1

Describe and evaluate the sociological benefits arising from participation in outdoor activities.

Knowledge and/or skills

Understanding of the theories and concepts of the sociological benefits arising from participation in outdoor activities.

The use of outdoor activities as a tool for personal and social development

Improving client performance through outdoor activities for human resource based organisations.

Assessment guidelines

To achieve this outcome each candidate will require written evidence to demonstrate their understanding of all aspects of the knowledge and /or skills section. This evidence will take the form of an extended response assignment of approximately 1500 words.

Contents
Page Number

Introduction4

Sociological Benefits from
Participation in Outdoor Activities
Why we participate
Experiential Learning
The Benefits 5
Benefits of outdoor education for individuals 6
with additional support needs
Outdoor providers

Conclusion

References7

Introduction

The sociological benefits that arise from participation in outdoor activities has been researched and discussed widely. There are many sociological benefits that are apparent through the introduction of outdoor education into a social environment. Several theorists have attempted to pin point the sociological benefits and some of these include an impact on an individual’s behaviour, lifestyle, relationships and much more. This report will aim to identify and discuss the sociological benefits and examine the various theories while demonstrating how they relate to an outdoor education environment.

Sociological Benefits from Participation in Outdoor Activities

Why we participate

There are many reasons why a person goes out to find a new sport or hobby. These may include wanting to become fitter, or better skilled or just to make new friends. There are also individuals that participate through their involvement in various groups and youth projects like The Princes Trust, Disability Snowsports UK and Outward Bound. Whatever the reason for beginning a journey into outdoor education is, it is rarely the reason for continued involvement. This reasoning is supported by Maslows theory of hierarchy. Maslow (1943) discussed that “we each have a hierarchy of needs that ranges from "lower" to "higher." As lower needs are fulfilled there is a tendency for other, higher needs to emerge.” A good example of this is a personal one for me. I myself attended a few sessions with the Disability Snowsports Scotland group. This started out initially as a placement that was required for college, a lower need because I didn't chose to do it for myself, however after completing my placement I found the experience so fulfilling that I now continue to participate in the coaching of skiing at this group. My continued involved represents my higher need.

Experiential Learning

Before understanding the sociological benefits it is important to identify the sociol theorists investigating such areas. Aristotle said that "For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them" Bynum, W. F. and Porter, R. (2005). This is also referred to as experiential learning. Although there are many different types of ways to learn, according to his research experiential learning appears to have the greatest impact in an outdoor activity environment. In agreement with this research, David Kolb (1984), an educational theorist in America, states that...
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