Socio 120

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SOC 212: SEXUALITIES

SPRING 2013T TH 12:30PM-1:45PM2LCC C003

Instructor: Ray Sin Teaching Assistant: Jessi Holzman Office: 4126C BSB Office: 4061 BSB
Email: rsin2@uic.edu Email: jholzm2@uic.edu
Office Hours: Mon 1pm-2pm Office Hours: Tues 2pm-3pm

This syllabus outlines the content of this course and my expectations of you for the semester. This is a very important course resource, so please read through it carefully.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

“Sexuality is something that society produces in complex ways. It is a result of diverse social practices that give meaning to social activities, of struggles between those who have the power to define and regulate, and those who resist. Sexuality is not given, it is a product of negotiation, struggle and human agency.” —Jeffrey Weeks (1986: 25)

Sex is everywhere. We see sexuality present in advertising, political rhetoric, legislation, advice columns, television shows, music, movies and all other aspects of everyday life. How do we study sexuality then?

Sexuality is a phenomenon that goes beyond its common perception as something solely biological or a jumping off point for marketing. In short, I am inviting you to join me in discovering what makes sexuality sociologically interesting.

This course is divided into five parts. In Part I, we will explore the different ways people have thought about sexuality across time, from framing it as purely biological to how it is socially produced to how queer theory burst onto the scene. In Part II, we will look at how sexuality is omnipresent, in multiple ways, in our everyday life. In Part III, we will consider how sexuality goes hand in hand with health. In Part IV, we will discuss how sexuality, despite being a private matter, is a highly politicized issue. We will end with discussing how sexuality is policed and controlled. We will also consider how inequalities surrounding sexualities is linked to other forms of oppression such as race, class and gender.

This course requires some reading as well as a substantial amount of mental/intellectual commitment. If you are unable to do so because of your other commitments within and outside of school, please reconsider taking the class. Additionally, if you are uncomfortable with frank and open discussions on sexual matters, you might also want to reconsider enrolling. You are welcome to contact me if you have any questions or concerns.

OFFICE HOURS AND CONTACT INFORMATION

Learning is always in the process of happening and don’t be surprised if questions and concerns come up between classes. I will be available every Monday from 1pm to 2pm in my office. Outside office hours, he best way to reach me is through email. My email is rsin2@uic.edu. I usually check my email at least once a day and I will typically respond within 24-36 hours from Monday to Friday. In the situation where I have not responded to your email, even though you sent that email 24 hours ago between Monday to Friday, please send me a reminder email and put “REMINDER” in the email subject. During weekends and holidays, my response time will be slower.

Similarly, your TA, Jessi is an excellent resource if you have any questions. The best way to reach her is either visiting her during office hours or emailing her at jholzm2@uic.edu. She checks her email at least once a day and will try her best to respond to inquiries within 24 hours. However, please limit email questions to short inquiries (roughly between 1-2 sentences). Anything that require a lengthier response, please visit her during office hours. To facilitate quick email turn around, please remember to label Sexualities in the subject line and to include your name somewhere in the email.

FACING CHALLENGES?

If you have things going on in your life which will affect your ability to do your best, then let me or your TA know as soon as possible—don’t...
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