Social Theory Looking Glass Self

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Kirstin McLin
April 5, 2010
Social Theory Th
Looking-Glass Self

Looking-glass self and it can be found in every day life; it is a part of our literature, television, and especially movies. People in these cases perceive themselves as others perceive and respond to them, what social psychologists call “reflected appraisals.” It can have both positive and negative impacts on how one sees and relates to oneself and influences one’s self-image. Another example of getting knowledge about oneself is through feedback. It starts during childhood, where parents give constant feedback about one’s strengths and weaknesses. For example, one comes to internalize good and bad qualities, such as being "good" at languages and "not being much" of an athlete. In fact, there is a strong relationship between parents’ perception of their children’s abilities and the self-concept that the child holds. Later, one relies more heavily upon the opinions and the perceptions of one’s peers who become an important part and source of information in the life of a teenager. There are occasions of direct feedback during adolescence when one has many dates or ends up being turned down by various potential mates. Even teachers provide direct feedback whether through comments or in the form of grades. Self-perceptions are an internalization of the perceptions of the views of others, using a large set of network data from occurring communities. The results are compatible with an internalization model, whereby self-conceptions are instilled through interaction with high-status alters. Yet it does not seem that personality is simply an impression made in a malleable mind by the force of social interaction examination of longitudinal data demonstrates that over time, it is possible for individuals to bring others around to their self-conceptions, presumably because they are able to build up a reputation through consistent acts.
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