Social Psychology and Fundamental Attribution Error.

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psycology1.|The text defines social psychology as the scientific study of how people ________ one another.| A)|understand, feel about, and behave toward|
B)|think about, influence, and relate to|
C)|observe, understand, and communicate with|
D)|understand, predict, and control|
E)|perceive, think about, and talk about|

2.|In order to analyze how people explain others' behavior, Fritz Heider developed:| A)|cognitive dissonance theory.|
B)|impression management theory.|
C)|social exchange theory.|
D)|attribution theory.|
E)|self-disclosure theory.|

3.|Victor explains that his brother's aggressive behavior results from his brother's insecurity. Victor's explanation of his brother's behavior is an example of:| A)|the reciprocity norm.|
B)|deindividuation.|
C)|the bystander effect.|
D)|the foot-in-the-door phenomenon.|
E)|an attribution.|

4.|The tendency for observers to underestimate the impact of the situation and to overestimate the impact of personal dispositions upon another's behavior is called:| A)|the bystander effect.|
B)|the fundamental attribution error.|
C)|deindividuation.|
D)|ingroup bias.|
E)|the mere exposure effect.|

5.|Students who were told that a young woman had been instructed to act in a very unfriendly way for the purposes of the experiment concluded that her behavior:| A)|reflected her personal disposition.|

B)|was situationally determined.|
C)|demonstrated role playing.|
D)|illustrated normative social influence.|
E)|was the product of deindividuation.|

6.|A dispositional attribution is to ________ as a situational attribution is to ________.| A)|normative influence; informational influence|
B)|high ability; low motivation|
C)|personality traits; social roles|
D)|politically liberal; politically conservative|
E)|introversion; extraversion|

7.|Rhonda has just learned that her neighbor Patricia was involved in an automobile accident at a nearby intersection. The tendency to make the fundamental attribution error may lead Rhonda to conclude:| A)|“They need to improve the visibility at that corner.”| B)|“Patricia's brakes must have failed.”|

C)|“Patricia's recklessness has finally gotten her into trouble.”| D)|“Patricia's children probably distracted her.”|
E)|“The road must have been wet and slippery.”|

8.|You would probably be least likely to commit the fundamental attribution error in explaining why:| A)|you failed a college test.|
B)|a fellow classmate was late for class.|
C)|your professor gave a boring lecture.|
D)|the college administration decided to raise next year's tuition costs.|

9.|One explanation for the fundamental attribution error involves:| A)|deindividuation.|
B)|group polarization.|
C)|attentional focus.|
D)|the mere exposure effect.|
E)|social loafing.|

10.|The fundamental attribution error is most likely to lead observers to conclude that unemployed people:| A)|are victims of discrimination.|
B)|are irresponsible and unmotivated.|
C)|have parents who provided poor models of social responsibility.| D)|attended schools that provided an inferior education.|
E)|are victims of bad luck.|

11.|Poverty and unemployment are likely to be explained in terms of ________ by political liberals and in terms of ________ by political conservatives.| A)|personal dispositions; situational constraints|

B)|normative influence; informational influence|
C)|situational constraints; personal dispositions|
D)|informational influence; normative influence|

12.|Beliefs and feelings that predispose us to respond in particular ways to objects, people, and events are called:| A)|roles.|
B)|norms.|
C)|attitudes.|
D)|attributions.|

13.|During the 1960s, dozens of research studies challenged the common assumption that attitudes:| A)|can be measured.|
B)|guide our actions.|
C)|are shaped through social influence.|
D)|remain stable throughout our life.|
E)|are correlated with personality traits.|

14.|Which of the...
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