Social Policy

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  • Topic: Social security, Welfare state, Unemployment
  • Pages : 5 (1672 words )
  • Download(s) : 82
  • Published : April 17, 2013
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The focus of this essay is to explore how far the development of the welfare state succeeded in eradicating poverty and inequality that was identified in the 1942 Beveridge Report. It will include how Rowntree’s second report identified the minimum income of which a family should be able to live off, and how the National Insurance Act provided a source of income for those who were below the poverty line. It will also include how the ‘Poor and the Poorest’ report change the poverty line and how Thatcher change the benefit systems in relation to public expenditure. In 1936 Rowntree produced his second report on poverty titled ‘Poverty and Progress’ (Scott, 2007). Rowntree described poverty as an inadequate income that would not uphold a person’s health or maintain a small amount of social involvement (Deacon in Gladstone, 2007, Scott, 2007). He considered what different family units would need to spend on food, clothes and rent and this was the minimum income that a family should live off; this minimum was introduced as the ‘poverty line’ (Deacon in Gladstone, 2007). However his calculations included a costing for things that have no nutritional value such as tea but he labelled these as conventionally necessary (Deacon in Gladstone, 2007 Scott, 2007). Following on from this in 1941 the Prime Minister Churchill commissioned Beveridge to look at the current welfare state to suggest how it could be improved (Cunningham, Cunningham, 2012). With his findings he produced the ‘Report on Social Insurance and Allied Services’ also known as the Beveridge Report 1942 (Benassi, 2012). The Report identified five giants that were want, disease, idleness, ignorance and squalor and his aim was to abolish them (Haralambos, et al, 2008). They were to be eradicated through the use of developing services, which would be funded and run by the government (Cunningham, Cunningham, 2012). Although want was the main giant Beveridge also acknowledged that...
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