Social Policy

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  • Topic: Welfare, William Beveridge, Welfare state
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  • Published : December 10, 2012
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Unit 7 Social Policy

LO1

Understand the significant historical and contemporary landmarks in social welfare provision

1.1 Outline significant historical and contemporary landmarks in social policy. Social policy is the study of social services and the welfare state. In general terms, it looks at the idea of social welfare, and its relationship to politics and society. More specifically, it also considers detailed issues in * policy and administration of social services, including policies for health, housing, income maintenance, education and social work; * needs and issues affecting the users of services, including poverty, old age, health, disability, and family policy; and * The delivery of welfare.

Social policy has been described as an attempt to change a given social order, which may involve the modification of market forces and the redistribution of resources. Social policy aims to improve human welfare and to meet human needs for education health housing and social security. In an academic environment, social policy refers to the study of the welfare state and the range of responses to social heed. The Key historical landmarks in social welfare focusing 1945 period were: In 19th century it was the role of religion, the voluntary sector in welfare, and in early 20th century Liberalism and the foundations of British welfare, votes for women.

According to the New Right, the welfare state had, taken responsibility and incentive for people to look after their own health, allowed lack of competition in the provision of services, leading to complacency with respect to quality of service, taken away choice, people were supposed to be grateful for what they were given, created a public demand for services with costs growing costs because people used the service simply because it was free. According to http://www2.rgu.ac.uk/publicpolicy/introduction/uk.htm ‘’The United Kingdom is a unitary state in which central government substantially directs most government activity. However, the structure of services in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland differs in certain respects. Each region has both a Secretary of State and administrative department situated in central government, and its own assembly and executive, which take on the role in the region of certain central government ministries. The laws which apply in Scotland and Northern Ireland are different from those in England and Wales. The Scottish parliament has in consequence very much more influence than the Welsh Parliament, and the Scottish government has the role of a civil service for Scotland, with a social policy in its own right. The administrative structure in Northern Ireland is significantly different: personal social services are the responsibility of the Health Board (as they are in the Republic of Ireland), and public housing is managed by Northern Ireland Housing Executive.’’ LO1 1.2

The Welfare State Timeline
I am going to analyse the historical landmarks of Social welfare policies for a period of from 1945. ‘’1945 - The Family Allowances Act provides a regular sum for second and subsequent children to be paid to the mother. 1946 - The National Health Service Act is passed in order to provide a free and fully comprehensive health service. 1948 - The National Insurance Act establishes the welfare state as recommended by the Beveridge report of 1942 with compulsory contributions to cover unemployment, sickness, maternity, widows, old age benefits, and funeral grants. The National Assistance Act is passed and the Poor Law abolished. The National Assistance Board is created to assist people whose resources are insufficient. The National Health Service begins on 5 July. 1951 - The National Health Service Act authorised charges for dental and optical appliances 1959 - The National Insurance Act introduced earnings related pensions and contributions - a major departure from Beveridge's principle of flat rate contributions...
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