Social Organized Crimes

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Social Organized Crime Perspective

Abstract

Within this paper the social organized crime perspective will be discussed. The term, social institution will be defined and explained how it applies to organized crime. Along with the definition of social institution, the empirical and speculative theories that are most applicable when applied to organized crime and the criminal behavior. The theories include, Alien conspiracy, Social Control, Albanese’s Theory of Typologies, Sutherland’s Theory of Differential Association, Durkheim and Morton’s Strain Theory and Anomie, Beccaria and Lombroso’s Classical Theory, and Biological Theories.

Social Organized Crime

Social institution is an individual or group of individuals with power and money who create an organization, which functions to satisfy basic social needs by providing an ordered framework linking the organization to the larger culture or community. They work within a community and eventually get some or most of the community involved with their illegal actions or crimes.  Some authorities consider organized crime to be a social institution because "the failure of the production-distribution-consumption function is the key element for organized crime's existence. The legitimate market's failure to serve sizable consumer populations is responsible for the existence of most vice operations. As a consequence, organized crime capitalizes on market voids and profits from services to these consumers. Several researchers have noted similarities between legitimate and illegitimate businesses. Organized crime’s provision of consumer goods and delivery of services are defined predominantly as illegal. Nonetheless, demands by certain populations make the creation of such organizations inevitable. The organizing of crime results from the dynamics of the production–distribution–consumption function of...
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