Social Networking Effects on Teenager's Face to Face Communication

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Social Media and Young Adults

Social media and mobile internet use among teens and young adults. February 2010

Amanda Lenhart
Senior Research Specialist

Kristen Purcell
Associate Director, Research

Aaron Smith
Research Specialist

Kathryn Zickuhr
Research Assistant

View Report Online: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Social-Media-and-Young-Adults.aspx

Pew Internet & American Life Project
An initiative of the Pew Research Center

1615 L St., NW – Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 202-419-4500 | pewinternet.org

1615 L St., NW – Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20036 202-419-4500 | pewinternet.org

CONTENTS

Summary of Findings Introduction Part 1: Internet adoption and trends Part 2: Gadget ownership and wireless connectivity Part 3: Social media Part 4: The internet as an information and economic appliance in the lives of teens and young adults Acknowledgements and Methodology

3 6 7 12

22 34

40

Summary of Findings
Overview
Since 2006, blogging has dropped among teens and young adults while simultaneously rising among older adults. As the tools and technology embedded in social networking sites change, and use of the sites continues to grow, youth may be exchanging ‘macroblogging’ for microblogging with status updates.

Blogging has declined in popularity among both teens and young adults since 2006. Blog commenting has also dropped among teens.

l

14% of online teens now say they blog, down from 28% of teen internet users in 2006.

Pew Internet & American Life Project

l

This decline is also reflected in the lower incidence of teen commenting on blogs within social networking websites; 52% of teen social network users report commenting on friends’ blogs, down from the 76% who did so in 2006.

Social Media and Young Adults | 2

young adults Acknowledgements and Methodology 40

Summary of Findings
Overview
Since 2006, blogging has dropped among teens and young adults while simultaneously rising among older adults. As the tools and technology embedded in social networking sites change, and use of the sites continues to grow, youth may be exchanging ‘macroblogging’ for microblogging with status updates.

Blogging has declined in popularity among both teens and young adults since 2006. Blog commenting has also dropped among teens.

l

14% of online teens now say they blog, down from 28% of teen internet users in 2006.

l

This decline is also reflected in the lower incidence of teen commenting on blogs within social networking websites; 52% of teen social network users report commenting on friends’ blogs, down from the 76% who did so in 2006.

l

By comparison, the prevalence of blogging within the overall adult internet population has remained steady in recent years. Pew Internet surveys since 2005 have consistently found that roughly one in ten online adults maintain a personal online journal or blog.

While blogging among adults as a whole has remained steady, the prevalence of blogging within specific age groups has changed dramatically in recent years. Specifically, a sharp decline in blogging by young adults has been tempered by a corresponding increase in blogging among older adults.

l

In December 2007, 24% of online 18-29 year olds reported blogging, compared with 7% of those thirty and older.

l

By 2009, just 15% of internet users ages 18-29 maintain a blog—a nine percentage However, 11% of internet users ages thirty and older now Adults | 3 Social Media and Young

point drop in two years. Pew Internet & American Life Project

maintain a personal blog.

l

In December 2007, 24% of online 18-29 year olds reported blogging, compared with 7% of those thirty and older.

l

By 2009, just 15% of internet users ages 18-29 maintain a blog—a nine percentage point drop in two years. However, 11% of internet users ages thirty and older now maintain a personal blog.

Both teen and adult use of social networking sites has...
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