Social Networking

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SOCIAL NETWORKING
Abstract
Social networking sites were first established in 1995. Its purpose was focused on bringing people together to interact with each other through chat rooms and share personal information and ideas around any topics through personal homepage publishing tools. Today, social networking sites are taking the internet by storm and are causing dramatic change in the way society connects and interacts with each other. Daily new sites are being created and are capturing the attention of people and businesses worldwide. Method: The research was conducted through survey questionnaires administered online to three populations: Young people 18+, Adult-parents- employees and Employers. The survey was aimed to determine the influence of social networking websites on the overall society. The research questions were evaluated through the views and experiences of these three sectors. Conclusion: It was found that for the young respondents online social networking had become more than just a hobby or a means of staying in touch with friends. The length of time spent on these websites was lesser in adults who were parents. The responses from this sector also revealed concerns about giving out private information. The responses to the third employer section suggested that social networking websites were good means for recruiting and evaluating potential employees. It was found that many employers surveyed various networking websites for comments about regarding their company as negative forums can be damaging to the reputation of the business.

Table of Contents
Page
Abstract2
Table of Contents Page3
CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION6
CHAPTER 2: LITERATURE REVIEW15
CHAPTER 4: DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS49
CHAPTER 5: ANALYSIS56
CHAPTER 6: CONCLUSION58
List of References60
Appendix62

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
The broad appeal of social-networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook seems to have its roots in a successful twist on the age-old concept of self-promotion. By allowing, let alone encouraging, the solicitation and promotion of anything and everything, social-networking sites have tapped into society's infatuation with customization and drawing attention to one's self (Daniels 2007). As poster children of the recent Web 2.0 movement, social networking services such as MySpace and Facebook redefine and change the way people - in particular, teenagers and young adults - interact. For example, many university campus organizations now advertise by sending invitations on Facebook instead of distributing paper fliers. Advertising in this manner is quicker and cheaper. Moreover, invitees on Facebook can easily check which of their friends are attending a particular event, and accept or decline the invitation accordingly. Facebook has also found its way onto the dating scene (Landis 2007). Social networking services are part of the Web 2.0 movement because they embrace the second, third, and fourth principles. Indeed, user content and activities almost entirely drive online social networks. A site becomes "richer" as more people add content and use its services. Online social networks also harness the collective intelligence of their members in developing their sites. A service does not create the majority of its communities. Instead, the service's users, through creating friendships, develop the bulk of communities that ultimately form the foundation of the social network (Espejo 2008). Social networking sites can be incredibly addictive. They are an almost unrivalled source of gossip, and getting in touch with old friends and keeping up with new ones can be time consuming. As the popularity of sites like Facebook grows, there has been an increasing tendency for workers to check and update their Facebook profiles at their desks. A recent survey found out that the sites are costing employers £30.8 billion per year and 233 million hours in lost work (IGOE 2008). Employees casually leaving...
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