Social Media; Professional Ethics and Responsibilities

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 70
  • Published : April 28, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Social Media; Professional Ethics and Responsibilities .................................................................................................. 3 References ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Appendix A – Survey Questions ............................................................................................................................................... 5 Appendix B - Social Media Survey Responses .................................................................................................................... 6

SOCIAL MEDIA; PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
What better place to get the definition of social media than from one form of social media. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopaedia written collaboratively by private contributors, defines social media as “interactive platforms via which individuals and communities create and share user-generated content” (Wikipedia). Types of social media listed in the article include Internet forums, weblogs, social blogs, microblogging, wikis, social networks and podcasts. Interestingly, of the 20 responses to opening question of the survey, the majority responded with answers themed around interaction, communication, connecting and sharing. Questions 4 and 5 of the survey asked the respondents to consider two similar but fundamentally different questions. Of the 19 responses to question four, 14 people believed there was no issue with looking up potential job applicants to see if they had publically available social media pages (e.g. Facebook accounts). When presented with a situation where someone has a private account, (i.e. it cannot be found with a simple search, but can be seen by fiends/associates of the owner), it was interesting to see that 37% of responders did not think an employer would be acting...
tracking img