Social Media and Privacy

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  • Published : February 17, 2013
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Justin Kacherian
At a point in time where personal information is dealt with utmost prudence, any action that undermines its privacy is generally looked down upon. However, according to Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook, privacy loss is the “social norm” and is being accepted more readily as the online community has no strict privacy expectations anymore. Essentially, Zuckerberg is correct in the sense that as Facebook evolves and delivers more accessible features that connects the online social world, it should come at the expense of something, which usually comes in the form of our personal privacy. In February of 2011, Facebook announced a new controversial program that would give third party developers and websites user’s personal information that ranged from phone numbers to home addresses. Consequently, our personal data was being exported to third party sites, which then used Facebook to advertise back to us in the hope of potential profits. Ultimately, this program was solely cultivated for economic gains on part of Facebook; however, it had to be withdrawn within a few days after the company was harshly reprimanded for surrendering users personal information for profitable revenue. The high volume of criticism was the reason why Zuckerberg came out and downplayed the privacy loss associated with this program and calling it the new “social norm.” Although a quote like this may seem very bold as it only justifies the wrong doing of Facebook, privacy loss should now be more accepted due to the new mediums Facebook allows the online community to achieve. From the ease of connecting with other people, through video and picture sharing, to just the basic aspect of presenting yourself through a technological way, Facebook has created a new spectrum of online communication that many see as a boon to society. Yet, as we rush to cling to the rapid developing online social world, we may be voluntarily giving up our privacy, but doing so with acknowledgement. In...
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