Social Media

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One of the most interesting aspects of today’s society is mass media, particularly social media. People day in and day out browse the web freely to find just about anything they want. You seriously can find just about anything to pleas the mind of any age these days. However, could social media be endangering our future as a society? I will discuss different views and also my own ideas of bettering social media. Including celebrity athletes as well and just how dangerous the mix can be. As over 69% of Americans watch some sort of sporting event, it’s important that we examine athletes as well. These celebrity athletes are looked up to by millions people, by terms of idols, heroes, friends or just overall good human beings. However it’s not whether these athletes are good or bad at their profession it’s what goes on outside of it, in the real world. The media has a big impact on our American athletes today, what we see on television, in magazines, in social networks; has an effect on us as members of society.

Social media is a dangerous animal when it gets into the hands of athletes. They are competitive to the max, they are arrogant and cocky. But who wouldn’t be when your image is out there for everyone to see. They often times refuse to think about their social status prior to using social media. Whether it be needless trash talking or inappropriate pictures, many athletes simply forget who they are and don’t get how to control their self being while social networking. The two major hits for athletes are Twitter and Facebook. Twitter is a very popular social networking service and micro blogging service that enables its users to send and read text-based messages, commonly known as “tweets”. Facebook is also very popular social networking services which new users create a personal profile, add other users as friends, and exchange messages, including automatic notifications when they update their profile. Professional athletes, like many celebrities, are using social media to connect with fans and share their personal lives in ways they never could before. But because of some strict rules and professional circumstances, many athletes are finding themselves in hot water after their poor times or controversial status updates. There are all kinds of incidents to choose from when trying to find bad social media practice when it comes to an athletes’ personal account. During this past year at the Olympics in London, we came across numerous bone-headed Olympians who decided to post while going for gold. One incident came when Australia’s swim team member Nick D’Arcy was seen with a gun toting gangsta pose uploaded to Facebook back in June. As an athlete representing their country I believe this type of behavior should not be tolerated, as our country looks down on violence and guns. Another incident came about when Aussie swimmer Stephanie Rice posted a photo of herself in a swimsuit that was a little more revealing than expected. Although this particular photo wasn’t that bad it definitely caused a national drama over the photo she posted on twitter. Though that wasn’t her first encounter with twitter, just a year before she tweeted “suck on that faggots” in 2010 after Australia beat out South Africa at rugby match, causing a nationwide drama scene. These two incidents alone hurt our society. Not to mention the thousands you see almost day in and day out. But these two in particular are picked amongst thousands and thousands of athletes to go and represent their country and perform at their best. Yet these behaviors are examined closely and give them a bad reputation and possibly destroy them as human being.

So how exactly to we better these athletes of stupidity when it comes to the realm of twitter and Facebook? I believe we educate them better. I know for me seeing is a better way of learning and understanding. More visuals will help. Show them examples of ruined reputations and careers as a result of an athlete being...
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