Social Isolation and Withdrawal

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 166
  • Published : October 18, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
A widely-reported 2006 study argued that since 1985, Americans have become more socially isolated, the size of their discussion networks has declined, and the diversity of those people with whom they discuss important matters has lessened. Sociologists Miller McPherson, Lynn Smith-Lovin and Matthew Brashears suggest that new technologies, such as the internet and mobile phone, may play a role in promoting this trend. (Sessions, Hampton, Her, & Rainie, 2009) People tend to carry their mobile phone and notepad everywhere no matter day or night. Social isolation refers to a complete or near complete lack of contact with society. New technologies exacerbate social isolation with the advent of online social networking communities, there are increasing alternatives to do social activities that do not require real world physical interaction. Besides that, people are gaining support through hours of texting and social networking rather than meeting with each other face to face.either on their webcam or just simply sign in to Facebook to chit chat. Although chat rooms, message boards meeting the need for those who are far apart, but misuse of these communication tools pulls people away from traditional social settings. In a study conducted by Andrea Cockett, she concentrates on children that depend upon technology such as internet, phones, video game systems, etc. These technologies are isolating the children from what’s beyond home. Children are being isolated from the outside world. (Social isolation, 2012) Other than that, Hikikomori and Otaku are two particular groups of users of digital technologies causing social withdrawal problem in Japan. This issue begins due to the technological boom which altered Japan’s social structure. Hikikomori are people who do not want to leave their house or room and isolate themselves from society for a period of more than six months. (Cha, 2010) According to the Oxford English, Otaku is defined as a person who is skilled in the...
tracking img