Social Change

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Positive Social Change
Education Colloquia
Walden University C4 – San Diego

A bend in the road is not the end of the road … unless you fail to make the turn

Walden’s Mission
Walden University provides adult learners
broad access to the highest quality postsecondary through a distance learning Text environment. Walden's learner - centered programs prepares its graduates to achieve professional excellence and to effect positive social change.

Social Change Task Force
Positive social change is a deliberate process of creating and applying ideas, strategies, and actions to promote the worth, dignity, and development of individuals, communities, organizations, institutions, cultures, and societies. Positive social change results in the improvement of human and social conditions.

Social Change Task Force
In addition, Walden University supports positive social change through the development of principled, knowledgeable, and ethical scholarpractitioners, who are and will become civic and professional role models by advancing the betterment of society.

Patterns of Social Change
Rate of change occurs differently across societies and its institutions Both positive and negative effects arise from social change, and are often disproportionately distributed. Some changes have only passing significance, others have more profound effects. SC can occur inside bureaucracies, outside, or in alliances that straddle each of these Laws can both facilitate and restrict social change (eg, civil rights, arresting environmental activists, marriage laws)

Social Justice
Equality and social justice is the goal of much social change Social justice - while people differ profoundly as individuals, all are equally entitled to consideration and respect (Sargent et al. 1998)

Social change
is brought about by:
Conflict/Competition
• For Marx, class struggle • Globalization - Sputnik

New social movements (NSMs) Technological Innovations Natural & Human made disasters Awareness • eg, environment impacts, AIDS research

Demographics
• immigration patterns

Educational Change - Fullan
However noble, sophisticated, or enlightened proposals for change and improvement might be, they come to nothing if teachers don’t adopt them in their own classrooms and if they don’t translate them into effective classroom practice (p.13).

What’s worth fighting for in your school?
(Fullan and Hargreaves, 1996).

Fullan – Hargreaves
The following are reasons changes don’t work:
Problems themselves are complex, and not easily amenable to solutions given the resources at hand. Time lines are unrealistic because policy-makers want immediate results. There are tendencies toward faddism. Most strategies alienate teachers. Structural solutions (like curriculum) do not come with appropriate professional development.

Which of these ring true for your district or institution? Why?

Systemic Change
http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/education/jlemke  Educational change is about interrupting sustainable processes and structures with deep embedding in a much larger social-economic-ecological system and Fostering the emergence of alternative processes and structures require understanding of timescales. All educational changes take place inside diverse, complex, multi-scale systems and seek to correct inequities.

Complex Systems and Educational Change
Jay Lemke, CCNT Reform efforts are more likely to be sustained when there is prior assessment of the school system and community readiness for change and when incremental changes alternate with periods of reflection, consolidation, and buy-in by all partners, including parents and the wider community [stepwise strategy]

Time Scale of Educational Changes
Phenomenon
Teacher-student ratio Instructional unit of 3-12 months Teacher-student relayionship Use of textbooks Frontal, proscenium architecture; single dominant visual focus Lecture, question exchange structure Age segregation...
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