Social Care Theory for Practice

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SOCIAL CARE THEORY FOR PRACTICE (OUTCOME 1)
ASSESSMENT 1(1500 words approx.)
(12th October 2012)

Coco J Hendry

Page 1Introduction
Page 2 – 5Assessment
Page6Conclusion
Page 7Reference/Bibliography

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The following essay will demonstrate my understanding of the importance and relevance of values to social care by explaining how social care values and principles influence practice. I will then explain what relationship my value base has with social care values. I will offer and explanation of my understanding of the term anti-discriminatory practice and provide some examples of how I would apply this in a social care setting. I will outline the legislation, which underpins anti-discriminatory practice and how this would influence my own practice.

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All care workers require recognising the importance of the two core values for care practice as suggested by “Janet Miller and Susan Gibb Care in Practice 2nd edition 2007” the value of respect for the worth of dignity of every individual. the value of according social justice and promoting the social welfare of every individual. Adopting and implementing these values recognises that each individual service user needs are met socially, physically, emotionally, cognitively without stereotyping, pre-judging or discriminating the service user, according to “Janet Miller and Susan Gibb Care in Practice 2nd edition 2007” The two core values appear to be paramount to both the service user and carer. It becomes clear that the application of the two core values enables the service user to realise their full potential and advocates promoting social welfare of each individual. Because of the carer, applying the values without doubt contributes the principles of social care values achieved; “Social care values are underpinned by the principles of dignity, privacy, choice, safety, realise full potential and equality and diversity” www.sssc.com My own values were primarily because of my family and my social surroundings. The social skills and values adopted at an early age enabled me to progress through school, social groups and friends. Adopting secondary values, shaped by culture, rules and values particular to social influences and settings Some aspects of the secondary values are an indication that as a member of a civilised society, the expectations is to conform and adhere to certain rules, regulation, and share the same opinion as my peers, not unlike the social care values. My values have been changed and evolved from all areas of my life, but the values learned from my family when younger have laid the foundations for what I deem 'acceptable' and 'unacceptable' This is called primary socialisation. My family were

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my primary socialisation, they taught me what was 'right' or 'wrong' and what an acceptable way to behave or conduct myself was and what was unacceptable. Although my values have changed with time these basic values learned from my family have remained. My own values along with the social care values and principles will enable me approach all service users as individuals in a professional, competent manner. However diverse or multicultural we may be doesn’t always mean we are diverse and considerate in our approach to specific groups, cultures, religions, etc Having been subjected to direct/indirect prejudices’, I am mindful to consider all members of society and strive not prejudge people, and to avoid discrimination at all cost. Certain standards are expected in a standards expected of social care workers that were first published in the “Regulation of Care (Scotland) Act 2001” A key standard underpinning social care is ‘anti discriminatory practice’ which means that as a social care worker I should not treat anybody differently regardless of their, gender, sexuality, age, disability, political, religious spiritual beliefs.

It is important as a social careworker to consider if I...
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