Snapping Turtle

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  • Topic: Turtle, Common Snapping Turtle, Turtles
  • Pages : 2 (296 words )
  • Download(s) : 1252
  • Published : March 13, 2006
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Movement

The Snapping Turtle moves with his four feet on land. In the water it's a natural swimmer, it uses its webbed feet and its tail.

Habitat

The Snapping Turtle prefers muddy lakes and ponds, but will also live in slow moving rivers. Those environments are ideal for the Snapper.

Protection

The Snapping Turtle has a giant shell on is back that protects it from its very few predators. When the Snapping turtle is in the water it is relatively docile and doesn't go looking for trouble, but on land it is very aggressive because it's very slow.

Gas Exchange

The turtle species all breathes through the mouth, and has lungs.

Food

The Snapping turtle is at the top of the food chain in its environment, when it's an adult. It eats just about everything that is can but some more notable organisms are Bull Frogs and American Toads; it will occasionally eat a Large Mouth Bass.

Relationships

Normally the Snapping Turtle won't have a symbiotic relationship with other animals. It likes to be alone.

Lifecycle

Snapping Turtles start from eggs that are laid in a hole on the beach. Once hatched, the turtles are in a mad race to get from the beach to the water without getting eaten by all the predators. A lot of animals come and eat the turtles on the way to the water. After that the snapping turtles grow for about 30-40 years.

Reproduction

The Snapping Turtle lays eggs after the male and female mate. The female, once she lays the eggs, will then leave never to see her offspring.

Behavior

The only unusual behavior is when the turtle is on land it is very aggressive due to the slowness of the animal.
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