Smoking Cessation

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A Review of Smoking Cessation Education and Implementation for Nurses

A Review of Smoking Cessation Education and Implementation for Nurses

There are so many different facets of nursing. Nurses are given so many tools to utilize in our role of educator to patients. It has to be kept in mind that we are doing this with our patients continuously. Every time a task is completed with patients and it is explained what is being doing, teaching is being conducted and hopefully they will take that with them in the future. Nurses need to be adequately equipped with the tools needed to teach patients. Without proper education, how are nurses expected to pass on knowledge. The article that I am choosing is Nursing students' response to tobacco cessation curricula in Minnesota baccalaureate nursing programs. The article is by Lenz BK. The article is about smoking cessation education for nursing students. They are trying to see if they can ensure if registered nurses that are coming into the work force have the tools needed to give evidence-based smoking cessation interventions to clients and if this can significantly bring the number of smokers who receive these interventions and treatments up, in other words, they are trying to decide if nurses that are given the education and the tools necessary to promote smoking cessation in their clients, the information is actually sticking with them and they are actually applying the information clinically to patients who smoke and could use the interventions due to their own self efficacy issues. There were 10 classes tested and 2 of them were given all the education and tools and showed that in the end they were much more knowledgeable about the smoking cessation interventions and 8 classes did not get all of the information and had inadequate teaching. They were therefore less knowledgeable when tested. Even with the education the 2 classes got with all of the information there was little clinical application overall. There was no difference between the classes that were given all of the tools and the classes that were lacking when it came to clinical application. It shows that just because the processed the tools to apply the knowledge give interventions to their patients, they did not use them clinically. There must be other factors then that are hindering them from applying this knowledge that they have. This research led the researcher in the direction that “Essential competencies regarding health promotion for tobacco cessation need to be established. Programs need to include all three domains of learning including cognitive, skill acquisition, and attitudes or beliefs.”(Lenz, 2009) All of these areas need to be factored in to see why there is not application of skills where needed and what can be done to change this. These are areas that need to be researched to strengthen the outcome and get these resources to the nurses and then on to the patients. This question is important to me and to nursing in general because it has a lot to do with nursing morals and dilemmas. If nurses are given the tools and education to teach their patients about smoking cessation and they do not use these tools to try to improve the quality of life of their patients due to their own thoughts and beliefs on smoking, then what really is our role? We as nurses need to put our feelings and beliefs aside and put the outcome of the patient first. The first supporting article chosen was Simulation-based smoking cessation intervention education for undergraduate nursing students, by Min Sohn, Youngmee Ahn, Heami Park, and Mijin Lee. We know that smoking is one of the most preventable risk factors that can lead to early death from many tobacco-related illnesses. Healthcare providers should offer good smoking cessation interventions to their clients that smoke. Very few healthcare providers get the training needed to...
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