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Compare and Contrast how Fitzgerald and Shakespeare present Internal Conflict in order to progress the plot in "Othello" and "The Great Gatsby". How far do you agree that Wilde uses a lack of Internal Conflict to achieve the same effect?"

In literature the theme of internal conflict is explored in a variety of ways, specifically through; asides, monologues and the use of the first person. “Othello” does this very well in that it has many asides and is a play, therefore internal emotions can be easily seen, and it also fits in with the time period as this is one that has been heavily romanticised, Shakespeare also moves the plot through these conflicting emotions in that they directly affect other characters and are the catalyst needed to create an interesting plot line. In contrast, “A Woman of no Importance” has a lack of internal conflict which is very unusual in the love genre; however Oscar Wilde could have been using it to show the wrongs with society, he also does it in such a way that it progresses the plot line, and strengthen his attack upon Victorian society. F.Scott Fitzgerald’s novel “The Great Gatsby” has a lot of internal conflict which is shown through the use of the first person and the reflective tone that is used throughout the book; Fitzgerald also personifies this in some of his characters, whilst all the while progressing the story with clever oxymoron’s and juxtapositions.. Throughout all these texts we see internal emotions and conflicts develop or become less evident, this happens as we learn more about the characters and as the plot line becomes clearer. The time periods affect the conflicts as certain constraints of society are evident in both “Othello” and “A woman of No Importance”, whereas these are less evident and less important in “The Great Gatsby.

In “The Great Gatsby” by F.Scott Fitzgerald, characters are often used in order to personify the narrator’s (Nick Carraway’s) opposing views of modern 20’s life, Jordan Baker for...
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