Sleeping Late at Night as Factor Affecting the Academic

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“Sleeping Late At Night As Factor Affecting The Academic
Performance Of High School Students”

Joaquin Carl F. Loyola
IV-Integrity

CHAPTER I
The Problem And it’s Settings
INTRODUCTION
Sleeping problems are almost always involved in mental disorders, including depression, alzheimer’s disease, stroke as well as head injury. And symptoms are strongly influenced by the amount of sleep a person gets. Difficulties may arise from the drugs used to control symptoms of disorders, or from changes in the brain regions and neurotransmitters that control sleep.

Going to bed late and waking up late appear to be just another part of how all or most adolescents are wired during that stage of life. This sleep pattern is not necessarily personality characteristics, a sign of laziness, or a desire stay up late even though many will spend the time partying or talking on the telephone. Early school start times do not mesh well with this stage of development. Although it makes sense that school-start times for adolescents would lead to better grades, more research is necessary to determine if this would actually occur. It is not only adolescents who have sleep problems that affects their education. In one study of 132 third, fourth, and fifth graders, 43% had sleep difficulties lasting more than six months. Those with the sleep difficulties were more likely to have failed at least one year of school than those without sleep difficulties.

Most children need at least nine hours of restful sleep each night. However, for many reasons, school-aged children may receive less than the recommended amount. The reasons for this shortfall include the working, eating and bedtime patterns of students and their families, early school-start times, and childhood sleep disorders such as disrupted sleep from snoring or breathing pauses.

Sleeping late at night affect the academic performance of the students because most of the students choose to play computer games, text with their friends or talking, watch movies, etc.
Recent studies found that adolescents used multiple forms of technology late into the night, including gaming systems, cell phones, and computers. As a result, they demonstrated difficulty staying awake and alert throughout the day. Disrupting the normal sleep pattern, whether with technology or not, can reset the brain’s circadian clock. A common problem, staying awake late and “sleeping-in” on the weekends, can make it difficult to fall asleep and wake-up during the week, so it is important to maintain a consistent schedule all week long.

Parents can determine their children’s individual sleep needs by helping them record their sleeping habits and issues in a sleep log. If the child is not alert and functioning properly during the day, sleep length should be gradually increased or decreased, or his or her bedtime routine should be adjusted. Technology should be removed from the bedroom.

Insufficient sleep and poor sleep habits have been linked to health problems such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, moodiness or irritability, reduced memory functioning, and delayed reaction time.

Review Of Related Literatures
"There has been an avalanche of studies in this area. It's moving very rapidly," said Emmanuel Mignot of Stanford University, who wrote an editorial accompanying the new obesity study in the October issue of the journal Sleep. "People are starting to believe that there is an important relationship between short sleep and all sorts of health problems." Not everyone agrees, with some experts arguing that any link between sleep patterns and health problems appears weak at best and could easily be explained by other factors. "There are Chicken Little people running around saying that the sky is falling because people are not sleeping enough," said Daniel F. Kripke of the University of California at San Diego. "But everyone...
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