Sleep Stages

Page 1 of 1

Sleep Stages

By | Feb. 2013
Page 1 of 1
Sleep Stages
Wyatt Rynearson B2

The first stage is the lightest stage of sleep the transition phase where you feel yourself drifting off. Stage 1 sleep would be the last stage before you fully wake up. You don't spend too much time in stage 1 sleep typically 5 to 10 minutes just enough to allow your body to slow down and your muscles to relax.

The second stage of sleep is still considered light sleep. Your body starts to slow down as well as your heart rate and breathing. Your body temperature decrease a little and you're beginning to relaxes in for the deeper sleep.

Stage 3 sleep is the start of deep sleep also known as slow wave sleep. During stage 3 your brain waves are slow delta waves although there may still be short bursts of faster of brain activity. If you were to get awakened suddenly during this stage you would be groggy and confused and find it difficult to focus at first. Of the five stages of sleep this is the one when you experience your deepest sleep of the night. Your brain only shows delta-wave activity, and it's difficult to wake someone up when they're in stage 4 of sleep.

It's during stage 4 sleep that children are most likely to suffer from bedwetting or sleep terrors. Stages 3 and 4 can last anywhere from 5 to minutes each, but the first deep sleep of the night is more likely to be an hour or so. This is the time when the body does most of the repairs work to help regeneration of things used that day.

Most dreaming occurs during the stage 5 of sleep known as rapid eye movement sleep. rem sleep is characterized by eye movement increased respiration rate and increased brain activity. Rem sleep is also referred to as paradoxical sleep because while the brain and other body systems become more active muscles become more relaxed. Dreaming occurs due because of increased brain activity but voluntary muscles become paralyzed.