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1) In your judgment, is it wrong, from ethical point of view, for the auto companies to submit plans for an automobile to China? Explain your answer.

In environmental point of view, where my ethic point of view strongly relies on, on international auto companies to submit plans for an small automobile enough to carry three people, rugged enough to commute across poor maintained roads across nation generating a minimum pollution automobile costing less than $5,000 dollars is not such a good idea. The world’s market for energy particularly oil, was based in part on the fact that China, with its large population, was using relatively low levels of energy. China would be consuming twice the amount of oil the United States currently uses if China ever reaches even the modest per person consumptions level of South Korea. Electric cars 2) Of the various approaches to environmental ethics outlined in this chapter, which approach sheds most light on the ethical issues raised by this case? Explain your answer.

That is a quite interesting question, if U.S. government decides to intervene in negotiations between U.S. auto companies and comes to agreement or whatsoever, that U.S. auto companies will not be serving China’s auto industry needs, the deck of cards would be more likely to fall into foreign auto makers such as Germany and others. To my surprise, Korea’s auto company, Kia, was not mentioned in this article since China and Korea has strong trading transactions. Kia would be the perfect candidate to meet China’s need for automobiles since Korea produces car so affordable rugged and environment-happy automobiles. The U.S. government would not have

3.The number of vehicles produced in China annually more or less equals the number of vehicles sold there, with both exports and imports at minimal levels. China became a net motor vehicle exporter in 2005 — a notable milestone — as exports more than doubled to 172,800 units, and imports increased modestly to 161,000.29 Total production and sales each totaled nearly 6 million units. One analysis calculates that 59% of exports were pickups and other light trucks, mainly destined for markets in the Middle East, Southeast Asia and Africa; 16% were passenger cars. Imports were mainly medium-size and larger luxury vehicles, which are coming under increasing pressure from higher-end domestic production.30 Another auto industry source stated that, “It will likely be five to 10 years before China is exporting cars in significant quantities.” Furthermore, “China’s biggest state-run auto makers don’t have big export plans,” according to this speaker, “since they are in joint ventures with big multinationals such as GM.”31 Consequently, the most active Chinese companies with export plans aimed at North America are the producers without major joint-venture tie-ups with the large international automobile companies.

American entrepreneur Malcolm Bricklin in 2005 undertook widely publicized efforts to create a 200-dealer network (“Visionary Vehicles”) aimed at selling 250,000 Chery-made vehicles in the U.S. market by 2007. The up-front contributions by franchise awardees were supposed to fund the $200 million necessary to engineer a competitive vehicle able to meet U.S. safety and fueleconomy standards. By early 2006, Bricklin had signed up one confirmed prospective dealer, according to Automotive News, a trade newspaper, which labeled the initiative as one of the “Ten Big Blunders” of 2005.32 However, subsequent reports are that Bricklin has secured $225 million in funding for research and development work at Chery from an investment banking firm located in Greenwich, Connecticut. He hopes to compete directly against the major Japanese producers in the U.S. market


. Problem
The Robert Hall Clothes, Inc. in Wilmington, Delaware are paying men and women different wages for essentially the same job. This is morally wrong because it is gender discrimination. II. Analysis...
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