Sistine Chapels the Creation of Adam and the Two Opposing Responses

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 139
  • Published : October 15, 2007
Open Document
Text Preview
The Sistine Chapel in Vatican City is known for its magnificent ceiling and beautiful fresco paintings, millions of people from the across the world travel the Italy to stop and see the works of Michelangelo Buonarroti. The Sistine Chapel ceiling is recognized as a masterpiece work of art. The paintings of the Chapels ceiling has been analyzed to discuss each panels significance and importance as Michelangelo depicts the nine scenes from the Bible, book of Genesis. One piece of work that is portrayed in the ceiling is the panel of The Creation of Adam. The Creation of Adam is known very much so as an icon of society. These days, the panel is recognized by advertisements, movies, and everyday functions to represent something other than the true value and symbolism of the intended meaning. However, it would be interesting to think what especially Martin Luther and William Shakespeare would have to say about Michelangelo's work. These two individuals have completely different opposing outlooks on life which makes it interesting to think how they would react to the painting of The Creation of Adam compared to the significance of the panel in this day and age.

Martin Luther was a theologian who analyzed and studied the religious truth behind God who became an Augustinian monk in 1505. In the year of 1517 Martin Luther wrote a book called the 95 Theses. "The 95 Theses is in essence a book that contains all the ‘good' and ‘bad' sins and explains the certain route to take in order to receive salvation from God" (Prof. Pajakowski). He initially saw himself as a great reformer of the Catholic Church who thought the force of his ideas would single-handedly redirect the Leviathan of the church; in the end, however, he divided Christianity into two separate churches and that second division, Protestantism, would divide over the next four centuries into a near infinity of separate churches. Yet, relating back to the Sistine Chapel, taking into consideration of...
tracking img