Get 20% off StudyMode
Read full document

Sister Calista Roy

  • March 2013
  • 2234 Words
  • 20 Views
Page 1 of 6
Sister Callista Roy's Adaptation Theory

Abstract

This is a paper on Sister Callista Roy’s Adaptation Model (RAM). I will discuss the basis of the theory which is to view the person as an adaptive system. The ability of a person to adapt to internal and external stimuli and the effects of the following three classes of stimuli: focal, contextual and residual. This overview will discuss how the theory defines and describes a person, environment, health, nursing and the goal of nursing. A patient scenario will be provided and the model applied that shows the essence of Sister Callista Roy’s Adaptation Module.

Sister Callista Roy's Adaptation Theory
Sister Callista Roy, a member of the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet, was born on October 13, 1939, in Los Angeles, California. She received a bachelor’s degree in nursing in 1963 from Mount Saint Mary’s College in Los Angeles and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1966. After earning her nursing degree, Roy began her education in sociology, receiving both a master’s degree in sociology in 1973 and a doctorate in sociology in 1977 from the University of California (Alligood, 2010). While working toward her master’s degree, Roy had noticed the great resiliency of children and their ability to adapt in response to major physical and psychological changes. Roy was impressed by adaptation as an appropriate conceptual framework for nursing. Roy developed the basic concepts of the model while she was a graduate student at the University of California, Los Angeles, from 1964 to 1966. Roy began operationalizing her model in 1968 when Mount Saint Mary’s College adopted the adaptation framework as the philosophical foundation of the nursing curriculum. The Roy Adaptation Model was first presented in the literature in an article published in Nursing Outlook in 1970 entitled “Adaptation: A Conceptual Framework for Nursing” (Alligood, 2010). Roy was an associate...