Sir Thomas More’s Utopia: A Text of Universality

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Sir Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) is a text of universality in which has fascinated and influenced countless writers. It is a novel, in which its primary motif and desire is to attack the ills of society and to point direction for the amelioration of humanity. It is a text of value in which it communicates, educates and criticizes Thomas More’s opinions and concerns as a political satire. It is the novels use of Utopic/Dystopic conventions, intermingling of fact and fiction and comparison, which heightens the believability of Utopia, in that it arises on the emphasis of his concerns on the concept of the rich vs. poor, and religious tolerance. More’s Utopia is a response to a specific historical time, which reflects on the many social, political and religious injustices of early 16th century England through means of satirical critique and contrast. During a milieu, where power was directly proportional to money, the 16th Century was an era in which the rich had perpetual power and both dominated and exploited the society and the poor. Thomas More emphasises and enunciates this concern, through the equality of justice and the uniformity of his Utopian Society and the contrast between the corrupt and ideal world. The homogeneity of the houses and the law acts as a polemic to dispute against the injustices of the rich who did nothing productive yet lived in luxury, while the poor were left in poverty and hard labour, essentially, it was an attack to the nobles of his time. Thomas More’s Utopian society was characterized to be the ideal world, a place of uniformity where “when you’ve seen one of them, you’ve seen them all” Thomas More contrasts between the corrupt (contextual time) and the ideal (Utopia) society to accentuate on the notion of the inequality between the rich and the poor. An example of this is through the description of the identical houses; Thomas More describes the house through the use of Burlesque to reflect on the situation of England at...
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