Sir Gawain in Canterbury Tales and the Green Knight

Topics: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Canterbury Tales, Knights of the Round Table Pages: 2 (535 words) Published: March 7, 2013
The Canterbury Tales and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
There are always similarities between two stories. In this case the stories of The Canterbury Tales written by Chaucer and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight written anonymously both have similarities of the knights. The theme of the two stories is the battle within each of the knights. But in a controversial case, the two knights in each of these stories has their differences. Gawain and the “Lusty Knight” both convey differences such as the quests they go on, their supernatural elements and their enemies. The quests each of the knights must go on tests their strengths as knights. Gawain must go a year and one day long (ironically each of the knights quests are a year and one day) quest to find the Green Knight and behead him. He succeeds in such tasks. In the Lusty Knights tale told by the Wife of Bath, the Knight must fulfill his word of doing what the old hag tells him to do. The old hag told the Knight what women really wanted was to be equal to men in power. The old hag later ends up asking him to marry her, and as a knight he must fulfill his duty of his word, so he marries the old hag. The knights both held supernatural elements in their stories. The Lusty Knight ended up having his old ugly hag turn into a beautiful lady. Because of his loyalty of his word and trustworthy self he ends up getting what he wanted all along, a beautiful maiden. The story leads you to believe he is rewarded with such a good turn around because of his loyalty to the old ladies word. Gawain in his story has the Green Knight beheaded right in front of him, but to his disdain the Knights head just sits there and the Knight rides away with the head in his hands. Also in the story of Gawain, the Green Knight turns himself into the king of a castle, that later Gawain with resides in for three nights. The enemies in these stories are both different within themselves, but slightly similar. The Lusty Knight is his own enemy...
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