Single Parenting

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Single-parent and Families

Single-parenting and Families
Single-parent families in today's society have their share of daily struggles and long-term disadvantages. This research investigates the effect of single-parent family structure on demographic trends based on the census, the challenges of everyday single-parenting, the effects on children on how society views them for coming from a single family, and economics of single-parent. Overall this paper examines the challenges of single parenting as well as what knowledge society should also have. Single-parent families can be defined as families where a parent lives with dependent children, either alone or in a larger household, without a spouse or partner. There was a rapid and drastic increase in the number of single-parent families in the latter half of the twentieth century. This change has been used by some to argue that we are witnessing the breakdown of the family defined as a married couple residing with their dependent offspring with negative effects for children, families and society (Popenoe 1996). Others suggest that single-parent families have been present in all societies over time and should not be viewed as deviant or problematic, but rather as an alternative family form (Coontz 1997). Regardless of how family diversity is viewed the increase in and prevalence of families headed by one parent has a major influence on the social economic and political context of family life. Demographic Trends

Globally, one-quarter to one-third of all families are headed by single mothers, calling into question the formativeness of couple heads families. Developed countries, in particular, are experiencing an increase in single parent families as divorce becomes more common. Divorce is not as common, but desertion, death and imprisonment produce single parent families, primarily headed by women (kinnear1999). The public image of the “typical” single parent is quite distorted. Many Americans would be surprised to learn just how much they have in common with the average single parent. According to Custodial Mothers and Fathers and Their Child Support: 2007, releases by the U.S. Census Bureau in November 2009, there are approximately 13.7 single parents in the united States today, and those parents are responsible for raising 21.8 million children (approximately 26% of children under 2 in the U.S. today) So what’s the “average” single parent really like? According to the U.S. Census Bureau…. Single Parent Statistics

She is a mother:
* Approximately 84% of custodial parents are mothers and * 16% of custodial parents are fathers.
She is divorced or separated:
Of the mothers who are custodial parents:
* 45% are currently divorces or separated
* 34.2% have never been married
* 19% are married (In most cases, these numbers represent women who have remarried.) * 1.7 were widowed
Of the fathers who are custodial parents:
* 57.8 are divorced or separated
* 20.9% have never married
* 20% are currently married (In most cases, these numbers represent men who have remarried.) * Fewer than 1% were widowed
She is employed:
* 79.5% of custodial single mothers are gainfully employed * 49.8% work full time, year round
* 29.7% work part-time or part-year
* 90% of custodial single fathers are gainfully employed * 71.7 % work full time, year round
* 18.4 work part-time or part-year
She and her Children do not live in poverty:
* 27% of custodial single mothers and their children live in poverty * 12.9% of custodial single fathers and their children live in poverty She does not receive public assistance:
Among custodial single mothers:
* 22% receive Medicaid
* 23.5 receive food stamps
* 12% receive some form of public housing or rent subsidy * 5% receive TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) She is 40 years Old or Older:
* 39.1% of custodial single mothers are 40 years old or...
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