Singing School Answers

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Mar. 1st, 2013
The Singing School

1. According to Frye, these stories stop being ways to explain the world and become part of literature when they cease to be beliefs. They’re really metaphors and part of the language of poetry.

2. Frye means by “every form of literature has a pedigree” and “literature can only derive it’s form from itself.” that every literary work comes from a related source or idea in literature. A writer’s interest to write can only have come from a previous experience of literature.

3. A convention is a certain typical and socially accepted way of writing.

4. Frye uses the idea of a newborn baby as a metaphor by saying that a new baby is a new individual but descended from the first humans, it’s parents. Literature is the same because even though there are new pieces of work, they all are recognizably the same kind of things as the old original piece of work. Ex. Canadian literature and new baby analogy.

5. The four story types are tragedies, comedies, romance and satire. They are related to each other by playing hand in hand in focal points of themes in literary work.

6. The principle is to identify similarities between the human and natural world and balance both of them out.

7. Frye says that for a mediocre writer, conventions make them sound like a lot of other people. For the popular writer, it gives him a formula he can exploit and for the good writer, it releases his experiences or emotions from himself and incorporates them into literature.

8. Robert Graves feels that the story The White Goddess connects all literature. Frye does not agree and feels that the story fits inside a bigger and better known one. Frye thinks that the story of the loss and regaining of identity is the framework of all literature.

9. Allusion- An indirect reference.
Allusions in The Singing School:
1. Gods and heroes from myths
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