Singing in the Rain Review

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CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY
SCHOOL OF MEDIA, CULTURE AND CREATIVE ARTS
ASSIGNMENT COVER SHEET
To be attached to all assignments
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STUDENT NAME: STEFANIE CHOW___

STUDENT ID: 7E0B7946 / 15649935___

UNIT NAME AND NUMBER: SCREEN ARTS 111___

DUE DATE: 13 AUGUST 2012___

WORD COUNT: 1974___

TUTORIAL DAY AND TIME: FRIDAY 0800AM-1100AM___

TUTOR’S NAME: MS. THARSHNI KUMARASAMY__
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DECLARATION:
I declare that I have retained a copy of this assignment. I have read and understood Curtin University policies on Plagiarism and Copyright and declare that this assignment complies with these policies. I declare that this assignment is my own work and has not been submitted previously in any form for assessment.

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WEEK 4 – Hollywood Spectacle and Classical Narrative
Screening: Singin’ in the Rain

DirectorStanley Donen, Gene Kelly
WriterAdolph Green, Betty Comden
Country/YearUSA (1952)
Length103 min
LanguageEnglish
ProducerArthur Freed, Roger Edens
EditorAdrienne Fazan

Synopsis:
Singin’ in the Rain is a musical regarding the evolution of the Hollywood film industry; from silent movies to talkies, with the introduction of sound in film. With the premier of The Jazz Singer, film industries had begun experimenting film making with sounds, causing two silent movie stars and film industries struggling to adjust into the new talking film.

Analysis questions:
Pick a musical sequence from Singin’ in the Rain. Analyse how the four elements of film (cinematography, mise-en-scene, sound and editing) were used in this sequence. Analytical Comments:
Singin’ in the Rain is a humorous musical film introducing a new era in filmmaking where actors and film industries are facing a difficult transition from the silent film to talking film. With the decision of turning ‘The Duelling Cavalier’ into a talking film, silent film stars, Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) and Lina Lamont (Jean Hagen) struggle to adjust themselves in the new film making environment, however their attempt in talking film had not turn out great due to the disastrous premier of ‘The Duelling Cavalier’. In order to combat the growing request of talking film and to save their job, Don Lockwood and his friend, Cosmo Brown (Donald O’Connor) pitched their idea of turning ‘The Duelling Cavalier’ into ‘The Dancing Cavalier’ to their producer, R.F. Simpson (Millard Mitchell). However, due to the negative respond received from audiences on Lina Lamont’s voice as heard in the premier of ‘The Duelling Cavalier’, R. F. Simpson became reluctant in casting Lina in a musical production, which Don and Cosmo then thought of casting Kathy Selden (Debbie Reynolds) as the voice of Lina Lamont, which she was not credited for after Lina had found out what was done to her in the production of ‘The Dancing Cavalier’, which turn the film, Singin’ in the Rain into a combination of drama, comedy and romance; the romance being the love story told between Don Lockwood and Kathy Selden. The four elements of sequence, cinematography, mise-en-scene, sound and editing are present in the ‘Moses supposes’ sequence. The musical consists of wide shots mid shots and over the shoulder shots. The wide shot of the sequence assisted in establishing the details of the room, including furniture and character placement; it also shows audiences the musical sequence, of the characters dancing around the room. The mid shot available in the sequence shows the audiences the mocking actions made by both Don and Cosmo when the both of them had snatched the book out of the diction coach’s hands and begun reciting the sentence simultaneously before bursting into music and dancing. The over the shoulder shot is taken during the sitting of the diction...
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