Similarities in Cold Mountain, the Odyssey, and the Color Purple

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Brittany Eades
October 27, 2010
English IV Honors
Similarities in Cold Mountain, The Odyssey and The Color Purple Cold Mountain and The Odyssey share many aspects of their plot. Both novels dominantly contain the theme of “The Journey.” The adventure contained in the theme “The Journey,” represents the journey of life and all that happens on life’s voyage metaphorically. Cold Mountain and The Odyssey both exemplify said metaphor. Many characters in both Cold Mountain and The Odyssey share many traits with characters in Alice Walker’s The Color Purple. The author of Cold Mountain, Charles Frazier, was born on November 4, 1950 in Ashville, North Carolina. Frazier attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in hopes his aspiration of teaching literature would come true. Frazier accepted a teaching job at the University of Colorado after he achieved his Ph.D. Frazier and his wife returned to North Carolina in 1986, when Frazier accepted a job teaching at North Carolina State University. Frazier’s first fictional piece of literature, “Licit Pursius,” was published by Kansas Quarterly in 1987. Frazier used his home of the Appalachian mountains as the setting for both “Licit Pursius” and Cold Mountain. Cold Mountain was Frazier’s first novel and was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 1997 (Werlock). Frazier researched the Civil War and North Carolina for around seven years before he began writing Cold Mountain (Contemporary Literary Criticism Select, “Cold Mountain”). According to Karen C. Holt, “Frazier’s research took him to a Smokey Mountain valley. At Caldwell Fork, he found the single grave of two civilians killed by Federals. A similar grave near Mt. Sterling, a few miles away, was where a fiddler and a retarded boy, killed by Teague’s home guard, shared one coffin. The two stories of murder and shared graves exhumed by Frazier’s research—the Shelton Laurel Massacre and the Grooms brothers’ executions—frame the historical...
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