Silas Marner Ib Commentary

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English Commentary on Silas Marner

The extract from the novel “ Silas Marner” written by George Eliot is unusually detailed and extremely descriptive. The novel “Silas Marner” is set in the country-side and it is set in the Victorian Era. This passage is the opening of a chapter and is about when Miss Nancy Lammeter and her father arrive at the Red House for the Squire’s New Year’s party. Eliot describes how extraordinarily beautiful Miss Nancy is, she describes her as bewitched, “Miss Nancy Lammeter’s beauty that she looked thoroughly bewitched in that costume” (lines 9-10).

The passage is divided into two paragraphs; one extremely long paragraph and the other is only a sentence, however the second paragraph seems to have a continuation. The first paragraph is about how stunning Miss Nancy Lammeter is and her frustration towards Mr. Godfrey when arriving at the Red House. Miss Nancy is on her pillion and “she wishes her sister Pricilla had come up at the same time with the servant, for then she would have contrived that Mr. Godfrey should have lifted off Pricilla first” (line 20-23). She does not want Mr. Godfrey to lift her off her pillion because she was upset and in those times that was one of the only physical contact men and women had, it was meaningful. Miss Nancy Lammeter is frustrated with Mr. Godfrey because at times he shows interest in her and others completely ignores her, what she does not know is that Mr. Godfrey is actually behaving like that because he is married to Molly. Miss Nancy’s thoughts were confused, “sometimes (Mr. Godfrey Cass) behaving as if he didn’t want to speak to her, and taking no notice of her for weeks and weeks, and then, all of a sudden, almost making love” (lines 31-34). Also in the first paragraph Miss Nancy conveys that Mr. Godfrey has no love for her and that he “led a bad life” (line 38) and she compares him to her own father who was the “soberest and best man in the country-side” (lines 39-40). In this same...
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