Sibling and Marks Attempt Question

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  • Topic: Sibling, Refused, TEXT
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2010
H I G H E R S C H O O L C E R T I F I C AT E E X A M I N AT I O N

English (Standard) and English (Advanced)
Paper 1 — Area of Study
Total marks – 45 Section I Pages 2–7

General Instructions • Reading time – 10 minutes • Working time – 2 hours • Write using black or blue pen

15 marks • Attempt Question 1 • Allow about 40 minutes for this section Section II Page 8

15 marks • Attempt Question 2 • Allow about 40 minutes for this section Section III Pages 9–10

15 marks • Attempt Question 3 • Allow about 40 minutes for this section

1130

Section I
15 marks Attempt Question 1 Allow about 40 minutes for this section Answer the question in a writing booklet. Extra writing booklets are available. In your answers you will be assessed on how well you: ■ demonstrate understanding of the way perceptions of belonging are shaped in and through texts ■ describe, explain and analyse the relationship between language, text and context

Question 1 (15 marks)
Examine Texts one, two, three and four carefully and then answer the questions on page 7.

Question 1 continues on page 3

– 2 –

Question 1 (continued) Text one — Image

‘Family Sculpture’ by John Searles
© John Searles

Question 1 continues on page 4

–3–

Question 1 (continued) Text two — Nonfiction extract from Like My Father, My Brother . . . I have this dream sometimes, that I am small and standing at a door. The door is orange and has a window above it. Through this window, which is slanted open, I can hear my brother and my father. I am outside the door. They are playing a game on the other side. I am calling out, trying to get their attention, but the door remains closed. My brother often sold me his old clothes. He would dangle them in front of me and offer them at a price. There was never any negotiation. If I refused to pay the price, he threw them out with a mocking, regretful expression. I bought many of his clothes but they never sat on me properly. I was taller than him, but skinnier, and his clothes were already worn by the time they got to me, so that I looked like a lost scarecrow. I rarely saw myself wearing them though. I made a point of not looking at myself. Instead I focused on the way I had seen my brother wear them, the ease with which he moved inside his skin. I was fascinated by his surface. All of my brother’s friends used to call me by his name. They added junior at the end as if I were his son, and so I was known, but apart from the history we shared, I was more aware of our difference. My brother has a broad Australian accent that he had acquired within a year or so of our arrival, and he blended in at school in every way. My own accent still carried the thick, stumbling textures of Holland. I was much taller than the people around me and solitary. My brother could pick up any sort of sporting equipment and act like he had been using it for years and he had an easy contempt for those who didn’t have that natural ability. When he was eighteen he said to me, ‘Have you ever actually stopped to look at yourself?’ There was such derision in his tone that I flew into a rage. I described in great detail how he had always put me down, how he had oppressed me, made my life hell despite the fact that I had only ever admired him. He turned white, as if all of this was news to him. After that, he’d sometimes find ways of praising me. He’d tell me that I was better with words than he was, that I was the clever one. I was used to admiring my brother because it was all that I had ever seen other people do . . . MICHAEL SALA

Question 1 continues on page 5 – 4 –

Question 1 (continued) Text three — Nonfiction extract from Sisters – An Anthology In this extract, the speaker reflects on her relationships with her two sisters, May and Phoebe, and her friend, Beth. In families, is nothing private? Too much is private. Too much cannot be spoken. Too much hangs on whose version prevails . . . In Sydney I have a...
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