Shut Up and Sing

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Shut Up and Sing Shut Up and Sing is a film that illustrates what the Dixie Chicks went through from their comment about President Bush in 2003 and how it affected there career through 2006 and beyond. This documentary shows how a simple phrase can send people so far over the edge and what affects something so small can have over time. The documentary, Shut Up and Sing by Barbara Kopple uses some excellent film techniques, good sound techniques, and even had good Mise en scène and exposition. In this paper I will take a closer look at each three of these components and explain how they made the film as good as it was. This film incorporated some excellent film techniques that can be found in some documentaries and others that are a rare occurrence. One technique that was used a lot during the film was jump cuts. In the beginning of the movie they used a jump cut to actually go back in time from 2006 back to 2003 when the incident took place. This was a good quick way to show the incident as it happened and then the rest of the film shows us their "recovery" process. Barbara Kopple also used a lot of establishing shots to help us get a better understanding of where exactly we were at almost every point in the film. This helped us know when the girls were on stage, at home, in the studio, or their dozens of other locations. One technique that kind of hit home because of how it made us feel emotionally were the close ups of each band member during a sad point or happy point in there lives. The close ups showed us members crying because of the circumstances around them, they showed them smiling, they even had a close up of Rick Rubin's facial expressions while he was listening to their tape. In this scene we also see some medium shots being used when everyone is rocking their heads up and down including the dog. Sound techniques in this film were limited to one common style known as diegetic sound. I was very surprised that nowhere in the film was non-diegetic...
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