Should Sex Educated Be Mandated in All Schools?

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Naveena Chittineedi

Should sex education be allowed in the American schooling system?

According to an article from Science Daily, “Sex education is a broad term used to describe education about human sexual anatomy, sexual reproduction, sexual intercourse, and other aspects of human sexual behavior.” Sex education is usually instructed at schools in the U.S. – specifically in junior high and during the first two years of high school through health classes. The primary purpose of this topic is to raise awareness of the changes that this group of students go through both physically as well as emotionally. However, allowing sex education to be compulsorily taught in schools has become an extremely controversial topic all across the country. There have been countless amounts of never ending debates and arguments by the American public who are for and against it strongly.

Statistics have shown that more than 50% of American teenagers lose their virginity before the age of seventeen and only 7% of American parents accept the concept of sex education in schools without a problem. On the other hand, most of remaining 93% of the parent population consider it a restricted and too “mature” of a topic to be discussing with their children. However, according to Buzzle, an online blog, it is not the presence of sex education in schools, but its absence that has made teen pregnancy increase to such a high level today.2 Buzzle believes that most of the schools that do provide sex education have an “abstinence is the best solution” approach to it. Abstinence is the only form of birth control that is 100% effective against both pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. It is the practice of refraining from one or all aspects of sexual activity for medical, psychological, social, legal, philosophical or religious reasons. The concept of abstinence, conveyed by sex education classes, works well with students because we all believe that prevention is better than cure. Also considering the age group receiving this education, it can be well assumed that students are not completely matured either physically or mentally to make decisions regarding their sexuality and its desires. Therefore, stressing the importance of restraint and abstinence through sex education is a great advantage for both their mental and physical health.

Although most schools prefer to use the “abstinence” approach to promote or prevent sexual interactions between teenagers, some of them actually have accepted the fact that a simple class taken at school will not prevent “hormone-raging” and rebellious teens from having any sort of sex. Instead, they have chosen to use the “safe-sex” approach. This approach primarily teaches students about different types of birth control contraceptives available for use to practice safe sex. This is one of the most important concepts that this curriculum probably contains. With the access to the Internet, information is easy to obtain on various topics including sex. However, not everything read on the Internet is valid. There are several myths about sex – pregnancy and disease prevention circulating around the Internet and in between teens, maybe even adult crowds that is not legitimate factual information. Some of the false information may include not being able to become pregnant if the female didn’t have her first menstrual period prior to the sexual intercourse, the “pullout” method being 100% effective, not being able to get pregnant while menstruating, and etc. This class serves as a purpose to educate students about real facts and effective methods to keep their body in good sexual health. It can elaborate in detail about different birth control methods such as birth control pills and implants, condoms, diaphragms, spermicides, sponges, shots, and even information about the Morning-After pill (emergency contraceptive.) These methods will and have been preventing pregnancy. Also, condoms...
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