Should People on Public Assistance Be Required to Pass Drug Screenings?

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Should people on public assistance be required to pass drug screenings? Almost all jobs and companies require a drug test before hiring you as an employee. So there is no reason a person requesting public assistance should not be required to pass a drug test as well. I don't mean random drug testing either. Make it a requirement to receive their benefits. Our country cannot continue to waste money and expect taxpayers to support them. Enough is enough. If we sit back and allow the public health system to run this way, we run the risk of not being able to help anyone in the future. Unfortunately there are people that do not want to help themselves or cannot help themselves. After all, this is an addiction and can be very hard to kick. Testing would be good for a few reasons: withholding benefits could force people to get the help they need; withholding benefits from those that refuse help or drug testing could save states millions of dollars, these millions could open up resources for other programs which need help. These are just a few of my own thoughts on this subject and from the information I have found through research, I am not alone in these thoughts. This problem could become a large epidemic issue if left untreated. According to the United States Department of Public Health, the issue of public assistance is growing by an average of 2.3% a year. Because of this growing issue more states are pushing for testing participants currently using public assistance. Twenty-seven U.S. states, as red as Arizona and Georgia and as blue as New York and California, may soon be adding another requirement for those applying for aid such as unemployment or welfare: Being clean. More than half the states in this country are considering legislation which would require recipients of public assistance to pass a drug test before getting their handout from the government (Cafferty, 2011). Seems to me that more states are seriously looking into this problem and it is a very...
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