Page 1 of 3

Should Colleges Lower Their Admission Standards for Athletes?

Continues for 2 more pages »
Read full document

Should Colleges Lower Their Admission Standards for Athletes?

  • By
  • September 16, 2007
  • 952 Words
  • 2500 Views
Page 1 of 3
In the modern world of colleges and universities, sports have become an enormous part of the social life of colleges. In order for these colleges to be successful in area of athletics, colleges must recruit naturally talented athletes. These gifted athletes sometimes are not academically eligible, as far as grades and SAT scores go, but colleges still accept them in order to run a flourishing athletic program. There are individuals, who are upset at this, because athletics are believed to be accepted at a far lower standard than the admission standard for the rest of the student body. There have been many arguments and proposed solutions be able to lower their admission standards for athletes based on their athletic merit, and why they should not. I deem that it is right for colleges should lower their admission standards for athletes

One augment is that there should be a special athletic admission standard, which would enable colleges to lower admission standards for athletes. This would enable colleges to be more open and not hush-hush about their admission standard, because its also no secret that colleges around the country, admit athletes who academically have no business being at these prestige universities of higher education. In the world of NCAA Division I football, it is an inescapable reality. An example of this was Vince Young who was admitted by the University of Texas. There was a chance that Vince Young might not have gotten in if he applied solely on academics, but Vince Young's natural athletic talent brought the school its first National Championship in thirty years. This would not have probably occurred if he had been cut academically. Colleges receive numerous amounts of money from these programs, and should be able to fund projects for other school programs. For example the University of Texas made reportedly $53,204,171 from its football programs alone, which was also tax free.

Another augment is that an athlete's talent speaks...