Short Sotry Wings Chips by Jm

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In the short story “Wing’s Chips” by Mavis Gallant, the narrators opinion about her father changes from embarrassment to becoming proud of him, because she learns to accept him as a great painter and parent. This is first shown when she doubts her fathers’ personal life. The protagonist says, “My father, I believe was wrong in not establishing some immediate liaison with this group.”(Gallant 205) Here, the narrator’s opinion was expressed by questioning why her father was not friends with the English men in town as he was an Englishmen himself. Also, the father is being accused of not having a real job. The narrator says, “… the question of my father’s working was beginning to worry me for the first time.”(Gallant 205) At this point in time, the narrator feels ashamed because her father’s job is not a real one like everyone else’s in the town. In addition to questioning her father, the narrator feels embarrassed by the father from how he dresses. The narrator quotes in disappointment, “…he looked just as sloppy on Sundays as he did the rest of the week.”(Gallant 206) This shows that from the appearance of her father, the daughter is embarrassed as the fathers image never actually changes, therefore always looking the same causing the narrator to be humiliated by him. Aside from some minor disappointments in her father, the daughter soon becomes very proud of her father’s accomplishments. This is shown while the daughter is staring at the sign made by her father, “I was hysterically proud of the sign, and for the first time of my father.” (Gallant 210) It is evident here; that the narrator was very proud of her father’s work and was very happy to admit it. Finally the narrator also realizes that her father has a job that is like all of the other men in town. While looking at the sign the protagonist says, “there it was “Wing’s Chips”, proof that my father was an ordinary working man just like anybody else.”(Gallant 211) At this point in time, the narrator has now...
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