Shifting Gears in Technology Education

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 90
  • Published : February 17, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Ms.
 Rita
 Atienza
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ED
 223.1
 

Modern
 Trends
 in
 Education

Shifting
 gears
 in
 Technology
 Education
submitted
 by:
 Galvin
 Radley
 L.
 Ngo,
 October
 12,
 2012
  As
 much
 as
 the
 curriculum
  of
 one
 school
  is
 different
  from
  another,
 more
 often
  than
 not,
 there
 

are
  still
 “ties
 that
 bind”
 in
  the
 form
 of
  common
 subject
 
 areas
 or
 disciplines.
 Though
 each
 school
 would
  employ
  its
 own
 strategies
 and
 curriculum
 design,
 most
 schools
 in
 the
 basic
 education
 level
 would
 still
  adhere
  to
 state
  standards
  that
 dictate
  coverage,
  or
 sometimes,
 even
 actual
 content.
 This
 is
 why
 each
  Filipino
  graduate
 (of
 basic
 education)
 will
  probably
 remember
 reading
 Shakespeare,
 discussing
 World
  War
 2,
  grappling
  with
 Noli
 Me
  Tangere
  and
  learning
  to
 identify
 scientiRic
 names
 at
 some
  point
 in
  his
  high
 school
  life.
 Such
 a
  phenomena
  allows
 states/countries
 to
 be
 able
 to
 set
 common
 goals,
 and
 in
  turn,
  set
  concrete
  expectations
  from
  each
  graduate.
  Unfortunately,
  for
 computer
  education,
  this
  is
 not
  so
  much
  the
  case.
  A
  rough
  survey
  among
  various
  Computer
 Education
  teachers
  in
  the
  country
  would
  reveal
  that
 each
  school
  has
  their
  own
  set
  of
  content
  and
  skills
 taught:
  ranging
  from
  the
  history
 of
  computers,
  programming
 to
  graphic
 design
  and
  robotics.
 If
  so,
  how
 can
  we
  determine
  what
  an
  ideal
  computer
 curriculum
 education
 looks
 like?
 Are
 there
 standards
 that
 can
 be
 established?
  Being
  a
  relatively
  younger
  addition
  to
  the
  list
  of
  common
  subjects
  areas
  across
  different
 

school’s
  curricula,
  Computer
  Education,
  or
  Technology
  Education
  to
  some,
  has
  long
  been
  in
  an
  evolving
  process.
  Early
 traces
 of
 a
  technology
  education
 curriculum
  began
 in
 the
  1960s,
 where
 in
 the
  US,
  an
 “Industrial
 Arts”
 curriculum
 was
  implemented.
  This
 focused
 on
 developing
 skills
  in
 using
 tools
  and
 machines.
  With
 the
  introduction
 of
  computers
 in
  the
  20th
  Century,
  this
 new
  form
  of
  technology
  was
  accommodated,
  while
  still
  retaining
  its
  focus
  on
  training
  students
  on
  how
  to
  utilize
  them.
  Manifestations
  of
  this
  would
  include
  instances
  where
  teachers
  would
  ask
  students
  to
  memorize
  a
  particular
  string
  of
  commands,
  or
 will
 given
  them
  tasks
tracking img